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Silverity

Indoor Gardening

62 posts in this topic
Any pictures? I'll post mine when I'm back home. How are those used?

---------- Post added 07-14-2012 at 11:10 AM ----------

Regarding this hydroponic system, where do you get the liquid medium and how often do you have to change those?

I'm in the middle of packing and can't locate my camera. Here is a pic I snagged online.

http://www.liberalbaptistrev.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/cilantro.jpg?w=225

I use it in omelets, soups, and various spicy dishes. It has a cool quality that adds to a great number of savory dishes. My favorite use is in fresh pico de gallo (sp).

I will not set up my system until I move. In the hydroponic greenhouse I worked for, we never changed the water. The plants filter it. I'm going to be using a special plant food from a hydroponic supplier and focus on keeping a good PH and maintain water levels.

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Why bother with hydroponics. If you want to be the coolest kid on the block go for aeroponics or stick with dirt.

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I love my little family of plants. I have bulbs, cactus, poinsettia, and some random plants thrown in there for good measure. I don't even know what half of them are, but they have doubled since I brought them home, so they must be happy. I have an empty patio that is begging for some plant life. I went out and bought some more seeds and can't wait to see what they will turn into. They are all flowers in a variety pack, so it will be nice surprise.

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My auto fem mi5 came up a treat. The biggest prob i had was ventilation and the feeding routine, as in feeding to little or too much. Ventilation is easily solveable by having money and feeding is solved by going organic. Top tip : DO NOT DO NOT use water retaining crystals in the soil. Stay away from peat pots as well. Getting the humidity right is a bit of an art aswell.

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My indoor green thumb turned black when I moved to Florida. Now I can only grow ginger, small windowsill hot peppers, and an assortment of sprouts. If the tiny ants don't find everything, my cats WILL, and dig all the dirt up.

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I grow plants in an aquarium. I also have one Phaelaenopsis orchid that i took from my mom because I didn't want it to die.

The one thing that most people don't know about is fertilization. These are living things and they need a nutrient source. Specifically, they need NPK, trace elements, water, and light. All of it needs to be in the range of balance or nutrient deficiencies appear. Death can also occur.

Getting the right kind of light is important. Chlorophyl reacts to blue and red wavelengths. Without the appropriate bulbs emitting light in the necessary spectrum, plants may not grow well. Fluorescent lighting is generally good for indoor growth as it provides red and blue wavelengths and is cheapest of all available lighting. 5000K-6700K bulbs are generally best as it simulates noontime sunlight. Special "full-spectrum" bulbs are also sold but cost a bit more.

Certain plants also need specific water pH requirements. Some need acidic soils and other alkaline. This is due to the fact that certain nutrients react to the acidity or alkalinity that helps nutrients to be transported into the plant.

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I have several indoor plants, although, I take them out in the spring and through summer. I have a pony tail pom, hibiscus, and some other tropicals. Plus I have many different herbs that I grow indoors during the winter.

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Thought I would bump this thread to see if anyone out there has successfully grown orchids in their home. I have a large variety of plants, but I've never attempted to raise orchids until now. So how's your luck with them? Any tips or tricks?

Over the weekend I bought two Phaelaenopsis from a local grower who maintains his stock in an industrial cave of all places. He offers classes, too, which I think I'm probably going to sign up for since I'd really like to collect a few more orchids.

Edited by Archaic Smile

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I have two very large orchids that I brought home around May/June. They are super happy!! I'm grateful that things seem good for them. Both are sprouting a new bulb/leave and one seems to have a root that is poking through the soil and turning green. Not sure what it's going to turn into, but I will just keep doing what I've been doing for the past five months and have my fingers crossed. :j

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I love growing plants...especially edible.

I started a bunch of herbs from seed indoors, and they're growing in pots in a screened porch right now...does that count?

Love it, it's so rewarding. Mostly basil and chives...they're so good. I feel so good about myself when I just pick off a bunch and add it to a salad or eggs or whatever - from seed to mature plant to food.

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What's the most challenging edible plant you have worked with?

Hmm... carob seeds, for sure! I was so excited about growing carob trees (because I really love the taste and health benefits of carob, including as a substitute for chocolate, which I love making), so I special-ordered some seeds.

They're really tricky.

You have to actually nick them with a knife, then let them soak for a few days in water (best if you can make the water hot/warm)... you have to wait til they swell something like 5 times the original size...THEN plant them.

I did all this, and still, they haven't sprouted, haha.. darn it! But, I did read that sometimes it takes them a WHOLE YEAR before they actually sprout. So maybe some fortunate future generation will get to reap the harvest.

ps, carob has a really interesting history, if you're into these kinds of things... I also read that apparently during the Great Depression, someone planted a bunch of these carob seeds along a school yard road, thinking that it could help out kids/families during economic hardship...it took them so long to grow, though, and when they finally did, I think people even forgot that these things are edible.

Well, I got going on a hot topic for me, haha, so you got a novel answer. But I like the question, thanks :-)

Also - hats off to your orchid-growing, I heard that's quite a challenge! Those are beautiful.

Edited by Winklepicker

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That's quite impressive for the carob seeds!! I just found out a few days ago that they are in the legume family. Totally bypassed that fact for years. :p I hope they grow for you! It's so satisfying seeing a plant happy because of how it looks and its growth.

I watched a couple of youtube videos and took what I could from it. Totally worked! I hope I get another bloom again. They are sprouting new leaves like there's no tomorrow. :j

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You have to be careful when you're doing indoor gardening because if you have a lot of lights and equipment and stuff hooked up cops can detect the energy spikes and may raid you because they think you're growing pot.

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It's too bad hydroponics is often damned by association. It would be kind of fun to grow vegetables indoors year round. Getting set up sounds expensive, though.

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If anyone could help with this, that would be awesome! I brought some plants home that didn't have signs on them to say what they were. (free plants) They have been doing wonderful outside, but now that the weather is changing, I'm not sure which ones can handle staying out there for the winter or if I should bring them in. Two of the plants have little "tropical" signs on them, so I suspect those would need to be brought indoors.

I live near Portland, so the winters aren't that harsh. But I don't want the plants to be stressed and die. Ideas?

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If anyone could help with this, that would be awesome! I brought some plants home that didn't have signs on them to say what they were. (free plants) They have been doing wonderful outside, but now that the weather is changing, I'm not sure which ones can handle staying out there for the winter or if I should bring them in. Two of the plants have little "tropical" signs on them, so I suspect those would need to be brought indoors.

I live near Portland, so the winters aren't that harsh. But I don't want the plants to be stressed and die. Ideas?

What type of foliage (shape, size, coloring, flowering, etc.) do your plants have? Most types of tropicals don't do so well wintering over in cooler temps. Bright, indirect light might be your best bet indoors.

Also, are they tuberous plants like a Caladium or Elephant Ear? Those are pretty tough to keep alive when you move them from the outdoors in. Once the leaves die back in the fall it's better to dig up the tubers, wrap them in newspaper and store them in a dry dark place until spring.

Edited by Archaic Smile

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I brought the ones I thought might do better indoors. So far, after a week, they seem okay. I just noticed a single mushroom came out of no where in my pot with three cactus in it. So weird.

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Thought I would bump this thread to see if anyone out there has successfully grown orchids in their home. I have a large variety of plants, but I've never attempted to raise orchids until now. So how's your luck with them? Any tips or tricks?

Over the weekend I bought two Phaelaenopsis from a local grower who maintains his stock in an industrial cave of all places. He offers classes, too, which I think I'm probably going to sign up for since I'd really like to collect a few more orchids.

My parents grow orchids. Interestingly, they do very well and flower constantly in their bathroom but nowhere else in their house. I think it must be that temperature, humidity and light must all be quite precise, but I've never really looked into it.

---------- Post added 10-05-2013 at 12:03 AM ----------

You have to be careful when you're doing indoor gardening because if you have a lot of lights and equipment and stuff hooked up cops can detect the energy spikes and may raid you because they think you're growing pot.

LEDs. Since green plants reflect green light, you can use red+blue LEDs to grow plants. Since LEDs are drastically more efficient than any other type of light, and since you're ignoring the portion of the spectrum plants don't use, you can get the right light levels without using noticeable amounts of electricity.

Plus, if you control each set separately, you get more control:

More red = fall, your plants will bloom and grow deeper roots.

More blue = spring, your plants will grow more foliage in order to produce more flowers/fruit.

---------- Post added 10-05-2013 at 12:04 AM ----------

If anyone could help with this, that would be awesome! I brought some plants home that didn't have signs on them to say what they were. (free plants) They have been doing wonderful outside, but now that the weather is changing, I'm not sure which ones can handle staying out there for the winter or if I should bring them in. Two of the plants have little "tropical" signs on them, so I suspect those would need to be brought indoors.

I live near Portland, so the winters aren't that harsh. But I don't want the plants to be stressed and die. Ideas?

Identify the species of plants you have and read about them. Every plant has different requirements.

Edited by Saul

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LEDs. Since green plants reflect green light, you can use red+blue LEDs to grow plants. Since LEDs are drastically more efficient than any other type of light, and since you're ignoring the portion of the spectrum plants don't use, you can get the right light levels without using noticeable amounts of electricity.

It's not drastic. I would replace a 600w hps with a 300w LED unit. But you would pay more the unit. You can buy units with replaceable modules to allow you to adjust the spectrum but most people would not bother. The spectrum is optimised for dope plants because that is their main market.

They monitor electricity bills looking for cannabis farms because they grow on a large scale they use a lot of electricity. A few hundred watts usage is explained by any number of household devices.

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It's not drastic. I would replace a 600w hps with a 300w LED unit. But you would pay more the unit. You can buy units with replaceable modules to allow you to adjust the spectrum but most people would not bother. The spectrum is optimised for dope plants because that is their main market.

They monitor electricity bills looking for cannabis farms because they grow on a large scale they use a lot of electricity. A few hundred watts usage is explained by any number of household devices.

50% of power usage sounds about right - this isn't drastically more efficient?

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An aspect of gardening I enjoy is maintaining aesthetically healthy plants as easily as possible. If I enjoyed minimizing my energy usage as much I may feel differently. LEDs are sufficient for growth and small footprints while being energy efficient, but they just can't replace the quantity, quality, fast growth, and ease of operation a 600w high intensity discharge lamp can. The red-orange spectrum of a HPS lamp actually outputs higher levels of essentially light available for plant growth. Effectiveness comes before efficiency in my book and taste for effectiveness. Orientating a HID light vertically and surrounding it with plants is a good balance of both.

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An aspect of gardening I enjoy is maintaining aesthetically healthy plants as easily as possible. If I enjoyed minimizing my energy usage as much I may feel differently. LEDs are sufficient for growth and small footprints while being energy efficient, but they just can't replace the quantity, quality, fast growth, and ease of operation a 600w high intensity discharge lamp can. The red-orange spectrum of a HPS lamp actually outputs higher levels of essentially light available for plant growth. Effectiveness comes before efficiency in my book and taste for effectiveness. Orientating a HID light vertically and surrounding it with plants is a good balance of both.

If you have a big operation, yeah. LEDs may have to be moved around and placed more closely to your plants (at least they can do this, they don't generate nearly as much heat).

I think in a few years, when LEDs start getting a lot closer to their theoretical lumen/W output (we're only ~30% of the way), the benefits will far outweigh the drawbacks.

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My parents grow orchids. Interestingly, they do very well and flower constantly in their bathroom but nowhere else in their house. I think it must be that temperature, humidity and light must all be quite precise, but I've never really looked into it.

I've heard that bathrooms are excellent places for orchids; mine would be perfect for the light and humidity, but it's small and the temperature isn't really consistent. Especially in the winter when the heat is on. It'd be worth giving it a try though.

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