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Ky1986

INTJ comes with depression?

77 posts in this topic

Any fellow INTJ's think they have depression or battle depression?

I do not have clinical depression, but often times wonder. I drift in and out of states that i assume would be classified as depression but i do not know.

just wondering if any other INTJ's think that this MBTI type has a higher probability of depression due to constant internal struggles to do everything and excel at everything and know everything. And anytime you feel like you didn't meet those goals you have failed - even though you've achieved so much.

Thoughts?

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yeah, it tags along. I wouldn't say that I excel at everything, or achieved much. Like someone else said in this forum that that comes with luck and resources.

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I think it tags along too. However as I've aged and learn to coexist with depression I think it more has to do with not standing up for what I want and getting too caught up with trying to "fit in". Now when depression shows up I treat it with respect and ask what am I missing? Is someone mistreating me? Do I need to make a change? If so what?

I spent years depressed not realizing that I was in a career that was all wrong for me. I was also surrounded by family that didn't respect my boundaries or my need to be left alone. I had friends that expected me to be extroverted like them. I ended up feeling like a freak and I was depressed.

Now I do what's best for me and I could care less what the world thinks. I take good care of myself, conserve my energy for what is important, and that keeps depression at bay. I also know that overachieving comes at a high price and one that I'm no longer willing to pay. Let someone else win. I'm tired. LOL!!

Edited by karenann33

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If you get depressed, either think it out to solve it, or make fun of stuff. It helps me.

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If you get depressed, either think it out to solve it, or make fun of stuff. It helps me.

I go into short burst of mild depression and this helps sometimes. Just don't do it around people (obviously) :)

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I think it's inherent to the nature of all four NT types to be dissatisfied with the way things are in general. After all, that's what gives the impetus to innovate and improve things, which is what NTs bring to society.

I can see that leading to depression for an INTJ, given the tertiary Fi and the tendency to internalize feelings in general. For other types it can lead to other issues: ENTP's can be rebellious to the point of self-destruction. ENTJs can become manipulative users. INTPs can become OCD.

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What sort of thoughts accompany these moods? Perhaps then we can get a link between ..feelings felt and type.

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INTJs tend to value both intelligence and competence, which are generally qualities not found in great abundance in the world, and we tend to be fairly perceptive about things, so there is naturally going to be some sense of disillusionment and disappointement when we compare what we can envision with what we actually experience.

I wouldn't equate this with depression but I don't doubt that it could contribute to feelings of depression.

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INTJs tend to value both intelligence and competence, which are generally qualities not found in great abundance in the world, and we tend to be fairly perceptive about things, so there is naturally going to be some sense of disillusionment and disappointement when we compare what we can envision with what we actually experience.

I wouldn't equate this with depression but I don't doubt that it could contribute to feelings of depression.

This is how I would sum it up as well. The difference between what I expect and what actually happens leaves me disappointed a good deal of the time. I experience frustration more than simply feeling down.

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I have struggled with melancholy, dysthymia + recurrent major depression since age 11. Causes include genetics (INTJ; lots of depression), environment (mentally ill mother; crazy family).

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I have struggled with melancholy, dysthymia + recurrent major depression since age 11. Causes include genetics (INTJ; lots of depression), environment (mentally ill mother; crazy family).

Are we twins?

It's like you took the words out of my mouth verbatim.

Only difference is that I sort of "cured" myself from depression about a year ago when I realized that life is too short to waste it on others' opinions of you.

But every now and then I do get down, especially when I feel out of place (which is pretty much all the time). Even though I enjoy my own company, every now and then I longed for companionship. Unfortunately, my current environment doesn't readily provide that. I am still optimistic that I will soon find like minded people to spend time with.. In due time I suppose... sigh..

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Any fellow INTJ's think they have depression or battle depression?

I do not have clinical depression, but often times wonder. I drift in and out of states that i assume would be classified as depression but i do not know.

just wondering if any other INTJ's think that this MBTI type has a higher probability of depression due to constant internal struggles to do everything and excel at everything and know everything. And anytime you feel like you didn't meet those goals you have failed - even though you've achieved so much.

Thoughts?

I don't know if it has anything to do with MBTI but I do often feel depressed.

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If there's any link between INTJ and depression, maybe it's just that we don't get out as much so we don't network and get solutions like other types do.

Other than that, depression has some huge physical causes. I don't see any possibility of a causal link with MBTI when it comes to disease.

I've been severely depressed 4 times in my life. Three times it was hormonal imbalance. Once it was related to severe allergies.

I have yet to be depressed for any psychological reason.

DH gets depressed annually because of SAD. We bought a special light for the daughter recently and he'll be using it when we get home. Maybe this year we can skip the St. John's Wort.

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Are we twins?

It's like you took the words out of my mouth verbatim.

Only difference is that I sort of "cured" myself from depression about a year ago when I realized that life is too short to waste it on others' opinions of you.

.

Sage, it is so interesting when someone says exactly what we would say.

I am not "cured" of depression. I have recurrent major depression which I believe is most accurately called a brain disorder rather than a mental illness. My dramatic response to medications confirms this. I had been symptom free for 6 yrs then got slammed with a relapse from Oct '09-March '10. I have learned the cognitive-behavioral strategies, take omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D3, exercise a lot, but this episode came out of the blue, was severe and the altered mood was downright scary.

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I have learned the cognitive-behavioral strategies, take omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D3, exercise a lot, but this episode came out of the blue, was severe and the altered mood was downright scary.

Oh my...that reminds me. One of the underlying problems with my depression that was linked to allergies was a sensitivity to Omega 3 fatty acids. I got treated for that one day and wow 30 minutes later it was like someone woke me up from a long sleep. And whatever that was, the result stuck.

I hardly ever get out of the house, so I'm on D3 as well, more for the calcium absorption than anything else.

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I'm an INTJ with schizoid, depression and mild OCD, so I'm set for life!

you got the bundle.

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I have struggled with melancholy, dysthymia + recurrent major depression since age 11. Causes include genetics (INTJ; lots of depression), environment (mentally ill mother; crazy family).

I can relate to this as well. The women in my family are infamous for being emotionally unstable and having various issues related to depression and addiction. I think growing up around those things made me overly pensive as a child and, in turn, made me look at the world differently than did my peers.

Usually my melancholic moods don't interfere with my daily functioning, but there have definitely been extended periods of time in my life when I was much more affected by mood. I'm sure my propensity for isolation has never helped, but it seems like isolating myself has been one of the only ways I've been able to cope.

However, while I think some MBTI types might be more likely to suffer from depression and related issues, I don't think they're mutually exclusive.

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During my teenage years I spent about six months on Lexapro. It may have been longer actually. I'm not sure. I believe the problems were because of situational stress; it was a temporary problem.

I often feel like I have highs and lows. Right now I'm about in the middle. I'm glad I've found this median. Taking great care of your state-of-mind is important.

I think much of the problem, for me at least, is that I am very passionate about specific things. When there is a violation of any kind pertaining to what I'm passionate about, then an alarm goes off and I immediately hit a low.

I don't think it is depression.

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I suffered from depression of various degrees consistently for about 5 years. The catalyst was when I became sick with mono in September of my senior year of high school. The results of me being out for a month of school was my being unable to keep up with and dropping out of pre-cal, thus closing the door to my taking a science degree at the time. I also gave up on my private piano and horn lessons, dismissing my musical options. I didn't recognize the pattern at the time, but these would be the first major events that follow my trend of giving up on things once the motivation is gone.

My depression came to a head about a year after I dropped out of university after 2 1/2 years worth of aimless study, as well as on the heels of my first major breakup. Naturally at the time of these events I was very stoic (and family members were concerned by my lack of reaction - heck, even I was), but deep down it was obviously taking a toll. In retrospect I can identify the attacks that were being made on my identity as the genius talented prodigy of the family as well as being validated by the love of another human being. Summer of 2007 saw me hiding cuts on my arms as well as me testing overdoses of sleeping pills. I was too chicken to go through with it but at that point I had pretty much accepted that I wouldn't live to see my 23rd birthday.

My GP didn't see anything wrong with me and thus refused to put me on meds. My social worker (because they didn't think me serious enough to send me to an actual shrink) was very cheerful and intent on helping me out, which was great until she came down with a flu and was home sick for about 3 weeks. Her promises to find me another therapist in the meantime went unfulfilled. It was in that dark disenchanted moment that I had my epiphany: "Nobody is going to get you out of the mess but you. Start upshovelling."

And I did.

My apologies for running off on a tangent like that. It just reminds me of a train of thought I've been having lately, and that is how most of my unhappiness through my life has been caused by me not embracing or knowing my true nature, instead opting for what I thought was proper. I spent so much time lamenting my lack of friendships in school that I neglected to recognize how energized I felt when alone and how bored and stressed I feel when with groups of people. I thought myself stupid for failing university long before I realized that it simply wasn't the right sort of learning envionment for me. I wanted to be feely and adaptable, and not be so logical and judging like my (then) cruel mother. MBTI isn't an instruction manual for Magicksmith, but I admit it has helped me recognize the talents that I do have.

So, uh, yeah. I guess the moral of the story is that this INTJ felt like jumping off the harbour bridge the more she tried to judge herself like an ENFP.

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I understand your frustration (I won't call it depression). "Often INTJs are perfectionist with extremely high standards of performance for themselves and others". I suspect the so called depression would disappear once you reach your goal (the closure).

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*shrugs*

I just stopped having goals. It got to be too painful to be constantly failing myself for the mere reason of losing interest. Long term focus has always been an issue for me. This sounds particularly un-INTJ-ish, sure, but for now I can accept it for the tenuous band-aid that it is.

Augh, I feel the need to go brood now.

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First of all I don't know whether INTJ's are more prone to depression. However I think it would make sense to say they are because INTJ's are more logical than the ENFP's and eternal optimists/idealists. The less logical you are the more successful you will be at deluding your mind with things that distract you from the overall meaningless of life. Maybe the optimists have a personality that yields more opportunities for distraction? Maybe the very thought of meaningless before has only more strongly fortified their denial? You see INTJ's are a group that likes the best answer. Once they achieve the best answer they won't change the answer unless they find a better one. The optimist however is optimistic because they want to FEEL good. Therefore in order to be an optimist you have to be a natural expert at denying everything that doesn't make you feel good.

Edited by Brosky
grammar

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