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notoppings

What book are you reading right now?

5,133 posts in this topic

I notice several threads about books and favorite authors and series. What I want to know is what are you reading now?

I just finished Andrew Piper's "lost girls" A lawyer who lives by "there are no such things as lies only misperceptions" His first murder trial with ghosts and a haunted lake. Nice read.

I just started Clive Cussler/Jack Du Brul's "Skeleton Coast" The Oregon Files series returns. Very fast paced thriller started it this morning around 8:00 am and will probably finish it tomorrow it's just that good.

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Unstoppable: Global Warming.

Can't recall the author but it truly is an awesome book.

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I have just read Mark Gimenez' "The Perk" I actually thought it was pretty good. After his second book I wasn't too sure about how he would progress.

I'm not reading at the moment, too much coursework.

I'm gearing up to read "By Schism Rent Asunder" when it comes out.

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Reading Consider Phlebas, a novel from Iain M. Banks. Great science fiction! I am actually reading this book a second time. When I dug in a few years ago I was so concentrated on the story line and dazzling plots and whatever, that I forgot to slow down a bit and enjoy Bank's superb command of language. It's a grim, but beautiful novel.

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Mary Doria Russell's The Sparrow. Initially annoying flashbacks but totally understandable eventually - a rivetting science fiction....not for the squeamish.

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I just finished David Lodge's Nice Work, a gently satirical British novel from the mid-eighties about the unlikely friendship between a middle-aged male managing director of an engineering firm and a youngish female English-professor. Slow-going at first, and the woman initially came across as a bit annoying, but it picked up partway through and turned out to contain a lot of interesting observations. The ending was too tidy, but overall the novel was a pretty good read. Worth singling out is Lodge's word-choice; it's often playful and affectionate, and you can tell he's a real word-lover. Which I appreciate, being one myself as well.

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Currently:

Richard Dawkins - The God Delusion

I would like to read:

Sam Harris - Letter to a Christian Nation

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Currently: Man in the Shadows by Efraim Halevy.

it's about the mid. east war and much more, from the point of view of the (was) director of the Mossad through the prism of intelligence.

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Wonderful list so far can hardly wait to check them out. Won't be back in town till wed/thurs , keep posting so I can give the library a bigger list. Thanks.

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I recently finished reading The Pillow Book of Sei Shōnagon translated by Ivan Morris and I am now reading The Twelve Caesars by Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus and translated by Robert Graves.

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If you are looking for a list of books to read, you could try some of these.

Sci-fi

Reality Dysfunction, Neutronium Alchemist, The Naked God by Peter F Hamilton (they make up the Night Dawn Trilogy)

Requiem for the Conquerer, Relic of Empire, Countermeasures by W M Gear (they make up the Forbidden Borders Trilogy)

Off Armageddon Reef by David Weber (The first in the Safehold series)

Crime

The Godfather by Puzo.

Colour of Law by Mark Gimenez.

A book that my girlfriend liked and I must admit I read on a sleepy afternoon is "After you'd gone" by Maggie O'Farrell

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I just finished a book on the Permian extinction called, well, Extinction by Douglas Erwin. Great stuff.

Will be reading Crichton's Next as soon as I get a chance.

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I'm reading Moby Dick right now. It's not as boring as I thought it would be, in spite of the fact that it took 150 pages before the boat left the harbor.

I think I might read something by Simon Winchester next. I've heard good things about him.

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Recently Enjoyed:

Supreme Conflict by Jan Crawford Greenburg

The Birth Order Effect by Cliff Isaacson and Kris Radish

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The Mammoth Book of Golden Age Science Fiction, edited by Isaac Asimov, Charles G. Waugh and Martin H Greenberg

recently enjoyed;

Foundation, by Isaac Asimov (I admit, I`m in a SF-phase right now)

War and Peace, by Leo Tolstoi

Reading Consider Phlebas, a novel from Iain M. Banks. Great science fiction! I am actually reading this book a second time. When I dug in a few years ago I was so concentrated on the story line and dazzling plots and whatever, that I forgot to slow down a bit and enjoy Bank's superb command of language. It's a grim, but beautiful novel.

I`ll have a look at that one, thanks for posting.

Yay! 100 posts at last! :)

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The Skeptical Environmentalist-Bjorn Lomborg

*a must read for knowing the real state of the world*

Guns, Germs, and Steel-Jared Diamond

*great read about why the world developed the way it did*

The American Black Chamber-Herbert Yardley

*a fascinating account on the birth of SIGINT intelligence in the U.S.*

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I repeatedly reread The Prince and The Art of War in hopes that I permenantly implant it into my mind.

Other than that, A Thousand Splendid Suns. Quite an empathetic book.

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I'm reading Moby Dick right now. It's not as boring as I thought it would be, in spite of the fact that it took 150 pages before the boat left the harbor.

I think I might read something by Simon Winchester next. I've heard good things about him.

I took on the task of reading Moby Dick I finished it but you're right about the lenghth of time it takes to get from one place to another, I think my favorite worst part was when he mention boats then went on to the history, yada yada yada. You could tell that this guy was paid by the word. Good story in the end.

Finished the Clive Cussler this morning. Have moved on to Sue Grafton, "O, is for outlaw" will try most of the books that the others are reading, thanks for the info.

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Ugh, I leave my bookshelf alone for a 2-3 seasons and there are already cobwebs all over. Anyway, even though I haven't touched these books for a while, I've been reading Biospheres by Dorion Sagan (it's more like an analysis involving 21st century technology and the creation of new living systems) and Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein. I'm not halfway through either of them, but I like them both.

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Just finished: James Baldwin's Go Tell It On the Mountain

Currently Reading: Golding's Lord of the Flies

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Of all "classic" novels, Moby Dick is one of my favorites. I find all the endless digressions fascinating.

Like many INTJ's, I think, I'm a big reader of science fiction and fantasy. Recent works of SF I've read include:

Nebula Maker and Four Encounters by Olaf Stapledon. Two incomplete works by the master of mind-bending philosophical SF. The first is an early version of Star Maker, and the other, not SF at all, consists of philosophical dialogues with a Christian, a Scientist, a Mystic, and a Revolutionary. Stapledon, ever the agnostic, takes no sides. It's not surprising that I found myself mostly agreeing with the Scientist.

The Man Who Fell to Earth by Walter Tevis. If you only know the movie, this might be worth a look. It's a very low-key and calm book. Many little details in the book found their way into the movie, but they are still quite different in tone.

I'm currently working on Tales From the Great Turtle, edited by Piers Anthony and Richard Gilliam, a collection of fantasy stories with Native American themes. So far it's fair-to-middling.

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The Skeptical Environmentalist-Bjorn Lomborg

*a must read for knowing the real state of the world*

Guns, Germs, and Steel-Jared Diamond

*great read about why the world developed the way it did*

The American Black Chamber-Herbert Yardley

*a fascinating account on the birth of SIGINT intelligence in the U.S.*

This sounds like the stuff I read. (parenthetical--I met a guy last week whose family member owns an enigma machine, and has it on display in his office.... It was so weird but classic NT. We were not more that half a dozen sentences into a conversation, when he told me this odd factoid out of the blue. (I, of course, think owning an enigma is pretty cool. Not a replica. The real deal.) This must be his rationalist screening device for Identifying Minimally Acceptable Women. sweet!)

My current list is kind of a mixed bag:

The Travels of a t-shirt in the Global Economy. Pietra Rivoli.

*extremely accessible narrative on globalization.

The Female Brain, Louann Brizendine.

*human physiology is amazing.

Shock Doctrine: the Rise of Disaster Capitalism, Naomi Klein

*well researched work on neoliberal economics

World War Z, Max Brooks

*Studs Terkel would have written this, if he'd lived through the Zombie Wars....

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