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AesSedai

How much of your salary would you give up for stability?

79 posts in this topic

The study below suggests that workers would give up to 20% of the amount of their income in exchange for a 9-5 job.

Stability in hours. Not working from home or other anemneties

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Is stability most important to you? If not, what is so important to have in your job that you are willing to give up money to have it?

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Posted (edited)

Enjoyment trumps all, provided the income covers basic living expense. I would give up income for more enjoyment in life. That said, even an enjoyable job may not satisfy all needs, or can become stale at times, so earning enough for more than the basics, i.e. to do other enjoyable things (besides work), is good, to break up the monotony and keep life interesting. If earning enough to enjoy life, while also enjoying work, then I don't need any more than that. I wouldn't turn it down, though, because I could put it good use helping other people in some way.

Stability is nice, but that is all. I'd rather have an unstable job I enjoy than a stable job I hate. Similarly. I'd rather have a lower paying job I enjoy than a higher paying job I hate. I do not want to spend ~8 hours a day unhappy, five days a week, for all of my life. Not if I can avoid it.

Edited by holdyourhead

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Lol 9-5. 6-5 for me. It's the only choice I have anyway, working as a cunsulting engineer requires years of experience and/or very expensive specialisations that I simply don't have.

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Posted (edited)

I already gave up money to do this kind of work vs. other kind of work. This kind uses my strengths, presents challenges I enjoy solving, makes a clear difference in the lives of others, and requires autonomy. 

Last week someone offered me work that would add stability and subtract or detract from current positive aspects. I don't need to answer yet, but at this point I don't plan to accept. 

Edited by vertebrate

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I already took a lower-paying government job to have strictly limited hours.

 

Could have made $85k constantly working on salary. Instead I make around $60k with a strict 40-hour schedule. And very low risk of being fired/downsized.

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All of it.

Wait... I have given up all of it.

HAW!   HAW!   HAW!   HAW!   HAW!

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I turn down clients for my own sanity. 

My job is as stable as it gets, I own my business.  I am making 6 figures income, putting me in the upper-middle class.  

I do not need Drama Queens in my life.  There is no reason to put myself in a position where I need to agonize professionally or personally, trying to deal with immature Drama Queens.   

 

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1 hour ago, Schubertslied said:

I turn down clients for my own sanity. 

My job is as stable as it gets, I own my business.  I am making 6 figures income, putting me in the upper-middle class.  

I do not need Drama Queens in my life.  There is no reason to put myself in a position where I need to agonize professionally or personally, trying to deal with immature Drama Queens.   

 

Do you live in a rural area/small city? Low six figures is decidedly middle class (not UMC at all) in most major cities.

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Posted (edited)

According to CNBC, Kathleen Elkins | @kathleen_elk  Monday, 20 Mar 2017 | 11:44 AM ET,

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Here's the breakdown of how much you have to earn each year to be considered upper income, depending on the size of your family:

Household of one: Minimum of $72,126

Household of two: Minimum of $102,001

Household of three: Minimum of $124,925

Household of four: Minimum of $144,251

Household of five: Minimum of $161,277

 
 
...... added to this post 0 minutes later:
 

I am in the Household of one making 6 figure income so this puts me in Upper Class.  

Edited by Schubertslied

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2 minutes ago, Schubertslied said:

I am in the Household income of one making 6 figure income so this puts me in Upper Class.  

Looks like we're just middle-class. :laugh:

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15 minutes ago, Schubertslied said:

According to CNBC, Kathleen Elkins | @kathleen_elk  Monday, 20 Mar 2017 | 11:44 AM ET,

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Here's the breakdown of how much you have to earn each year to be considered upper income, depending on the size of your family:

Household of one: Minimum of $72,126

Household of two: Minimum of $102,001

Household of three: Minimum of $124,925

Household of four: Minimum of $144,251

Household of five: Minimum of $161,277

 
 
...... added to this post 0 minutes later:
 

I am in the Household of one making 6 figure income so this puts me in Upper Class.  

I'm not sure that applies in all localities. By that logic, if I lived alone, I'd be upper class, and I am a teacher. Teachers aren't known for having upper class salaries. Now if I lived in the Midwest, sure.

But I don't.

Location matters.

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12 minutes ago, eagleseven said:

Looks like we're just middle-class. :laugh:

That is what I said, maybe upper-middle.

But the CNBC is saying I am not, that I am upper class.  

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7 minutes ago, Schubertslied said:

That is what I said, maybe upper-middle.

But the CNBC is saying I am not, that I am upper class.  

As @AesSedai said, location and household-type matters. According to the raw numbers (and government), I'm lower-middle class.

 

Yet...with two incomes and no children, living in an affordable suburb of an affordable major city, we have ample discretionary income. 

Please login or register to see this link.

 

We're well above the minimum salary required for maximum happiness in our region...while we'd be struggling to make ends meet in Toronto, for instance.

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

8 minutes ago, AesSedai said:

I'm not sure that applies in all localities. By that logic, if I lived alone, I'd be upper class, and I am a teacher. Teachers aren't known for having upper class salaries. Now if I lived in the Midwest, sure.

But I don't.

Location matters.

My house zip code average household income is $102,000.  

Maybe a bit more than that.  

Edited by Schubertslied

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10 minutes ago, Schubertslied said:

My house zip code average household income is $102,000.  

Maybe a bit more than that.  

Probably why you feel middle-class: you've got just enough to keep up with the Jonses.

Median income in my zip-code is $62,463, while the median house costs $161k. With a house below the median, and an income well above the median, we feel quite rich.

---

My co-worker, who makes considerably more than me, often complains that we're grossly underpaid. She lives in a neighborhood where the median house costs $485,000...so she always feels poor. I keep telling her she needs to sell the lake house.

 

 

 

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Median house where I live is $350,000.  

 

 
 
...... added to this post 4 minutes later:
 
9 minutes ago, eagleseven said:

Probably why you feel middle-class: you've got just enough to keep up with the Jonses.

Median income in my zip-code is $62,463, while the median house costs $161k. With a house below the median, and an income well above the median, we feel quite rich.

---

My co-worker, who makes considerably more than me, often complains that we're grossly underpaid. She lives in a neighborhood where the median house costs $485,000...so she always feels poor. I keep telling her she needs to sell the lake house.

 

 

 

I thought about buying a lake house, but tax in my current home is really high.  

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8 minutes ago, Schubertslied said:

Median house where I live is $350,000.

IMO, that makes it an upper-class area. The sort of neighborhood where a HOA will fine you for not whacking the weeds in front of your house, or prevent you from painting your house purple.

 

Quote

I thought about buying a lake house, but tax in my current home is really high.  

She does nothing but complain about it, another place to maintain, so I don't understand why they keep it. Ditto for the boats. I think her utility bills cost more than my mortgage+insurance+tax?

 

I *love* visiting other's cottages and boats, but I'm busy enough maintaining just one property with two cars. I don't want the extra expense or time-sucks. Same reason why I rent equipment on vacations.

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I gave up 100% of consultancy income to become a lazy bum. :p

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18 minutes ago, eagleseven said:

IMO, that makes it an upper-class area. The sort of neighborhood where a HOA will fine you for not whacking the weeds in front of your house, or prevent you from painting your house purple.

 

She does nothing but complain about it, another place to maintain, so I don't understand why they keep it. Ditto for the boats. I think her utility bills cost more than my mortgage+insurance+tax?

 

I *love* visiting other's cottages and boats, but I'm busy enough maintaining just one property with two cars. I don't want the extra expense or time-sucks. Same reason why I rent equipment on vacations.

I have a timeshare I use to vacation, and it is a gold-crown, so I really can't complain.  

I still want a lake house, and whenever I pass by a nice lake house, I would think about buying one. 

I read just the other day, that people recommend selling your current house and moving into a lake house permanently, because the cost of keeping up with a second house is too high.  

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2 minutes ago, Schubertslied said:

I have a timeshare I use to vacation, and it is a gold-crown, so I really can't complain.  

I still want a lake house, and whenever I pass by a nice lake house, I would think about buying one. 

I read just the other day, that people recommend selling your current house and moving into a lake house permanently, because the cost of keeping up with a second house is too high.  

Problem is, most lake-homes are nowhere near job centers, so unless you're retired or can work remotely, it's not practical.

 

I'd rather just spend the money on nicer hotels, instead of limiting myself to just one vacation spot every year. But I'm weird.

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Just now, eagleseven said:

Problem is, most lake-homes are nowhere near job centers, so unless you're retired or can work remotely, it's not practical.

 

I'd rather just spend the money on nicer hotels, instead of limiting myself to just one vacation spot every year. But I'm weird.

I trade my timeshare with other gold-crown timeshare owners, so I can travel the world if I want to.  

 

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Just now, Schubertslied said:

I trade my timeshare with other gold-crown timeshare owners, so I can travel the world if I want to.  

 

A smart move.

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17 minutes ago, eagleseven said:

A smart move.

I usually trade my gold-crown timeshare to visit,............lake houses, :awesome:

 
 
...... added to this post 1 minute later:
 

Honestly, the ocean view in the Carolinas are simply fantastic, and I have visited both the North and the South, 

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Posted (edited)

I used to be upper income according to that chart, but since being laid off five years ago I've given up 97.9% of income and now live off savings.  That will keep me in comfort until age 62 when I'll again be living the high life off of social security MWHAHAHahahahhahaha!!!

Edited by elTee13
ran the numbers

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10 hours ago, AesSedai said:

Is stability most important to you? If not, what is so important to have in your job that you are willing to give up money to have it?

Creative control, freedom. Happiness. 

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