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slade19

Biology amateurs (or not), critique this paper.

https://sci-hub.cc/10.1038/35038060

This paper, by Vreeland (2002), details the "discovery" of a 250 million years old bacteria that grew after being allegedly extracted from a salt crystal, and reconstructs a phylogeny.

The paper is basically really poor, and has been harshly criticized (and it got published in Nature of all places). The goal of the game here is to have you list all the shortcomings you think you see in it, and explain why it's an issue. I have an extensive list of grievances with it that I will post on the 24th, when I am free again (or, if I am invested enough, I could turn it into a practical tutorial in phylogeny for those who are interested in reproducing the steps I made to intellectually put the last nail in its coffin).

I count on your skepticism.

PS: I am aware I used Sci-hub here to link it, but the article is really not worth the money, so I feel no remorse in its piracy.

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It's honestly not too complicated, merely common sense. Why can't that happen and why can't the bacteria they test be related to marismortui in the way they say it does?

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Mind summarizing it?

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@slade19, admittedly i was between things, but the link gave me some vague russian (language) so i moved along.

if you do deconstruct the premise, i'll be one who reads.

sorry i've been a no-show in your and grepley's salon threads. i still think it's a fantastic idea. and it's not merely "entp commitment"; it's also real life.

any who... i have a copy of "the cell" coming shortly, among other things. :nice:

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the russian is only at the top, the article's in english..

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The Science Salon will maybe resume during summer, when more members are free.

12 minutes ago, Cak said:

Mind summarizing it?

 

11 minutes ago, Whoops said:

but the link gave me some vague russian (language) so i moved along.

The link opens a pdf (it takes a while) of 3 pages, a lot of which is not relevant per se since they describe the procedure used to sterilize the sample.

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Just now, toki said:

the russian is only at the top, the article's in english..

#inanactualhurry #butstillentpproblems

:laugh: fucking god damn it

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Here are some "hints"/giveaways:

Spoiler

How are mutations caused, and how are they normally repaired?

What's a phylogeny? What does their tree mean?

What do their results imply regarding the bacteria trapped in the salt for 250 million years?

 

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Too advanced for me. I am eager to hear the explanation however.

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Posted (edited)

Spoiler

I know very little about cleaning methods, so I can't say much about that.

The bacterium would have needed to exist as a spore in order to come even close to being 250 million years old, and spores have no active DNA repair mechanisms because the needed enzymes are inactive. DNA degrades over time if not maintained, e.g. through naturally occurring radiation, and after that time the DNA would likely be garbage. Yet they claim the bacteria in the sample was viable and used the rDNA to find related organisms, which was in such a good shape that it could be used to compute the precise number of substitutions per site per year compared to a reference strain. 

The tools they used to construct the phylogenetic tree essentially cluster sequences based on their similarity. The assumption is that similar sequences are more related than more dissimilar sequences, and they found minimal sequence differences with the modern B. marismortui (a lot fewer than would occur over 250 million years). So:

Quote

The reasons for minimal sequence differences between 2-9-3 and Bacillus marismortui are unknown.

The reasons are likely that the found bacteria are a strain of Bacillus marismortui and the reason for minimal sequence differences is that it's not 250 million years old.

 

Edited by Doob

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Posted (edited)

43 minutes ago, Doob said:
  Hide contents

DNA degrades over time if not maintained, e.g. through naturally occurring radiation, and after that time the DNA would likely be garbage.

 

So what led them to proceed as if it was viable? This seems like pretty common knowledge today. Is it because they didn't know almost 20 years ago when this paper was published?

Edited by Cak

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As a biology novice, I know exceptionally little about phylogeny.

That said, the warning flags from a non-biologist:

1. They note a discrepancy between the typical Salado mineral range and their date, with no explanation as to why.

2. They just kind of conclude that because the crystal is 250 Myr old, the bacteria inside must be the same age. This seems a heavy assumption, and I know enough about archaeology to know you can't always assume something found in one context is necessarily the same age as that context. It's rare to find something like a 3rd century good in a 5th century context (or vice versa), but not impossible. After all, I can still walk inside the Colosseum, and if I it and I were suddenly buried, future archaeologists would find a 21st century body in a 1st century building.

If a younger bacteria could be shown to make use of an older salt crystal, that pretty much blows the paper up, right?

3. Can DNA even last 250 Myrs to be sequenced accurately? I know they did this in Jurassic Park, but I was under the assumption this was more or less fantasy.

 

As a non-biologist, I wouldn't be surprised to be wrong on all these points, but as a skeptically minded individual, I'd be curious to see if I was at least thinking about things in the correct manner.

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6 hours ago, Cak said:

So what led them to proceed as if it was viable? This seems like pretty common knowledge today. Is it because they didn't know almost 20 years ago when this paper was published?

The bacteria were viable (able to multiply), which is why they are likely not 250 million years old. All these things are pretty basic and were known 20 years ago as well.

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1 hour ago, Doob said:

The bacteria were viable (able to multiply), which is why they are likely not 250 million years old. All these things are pretty basic and were known 20 years ago as well.

Yes, they came under very heavy criticism. The only reason they made it that far and got published is because they did try their best to work in the most sterile conditions they could. They should have wised up and accepted the fact that they failed after finding the results they did.

8 hours ago, Imperator said:

As a biology novice, I know exceptionally little about phylogeny.

That said, the warning flags from a non-biologist:

1. They note a discrepancy between the typical Salado mineral range and their date, with no explanation as to why.

2. They just kind of conclude that because the crystal is 250 Myr old, the bacteria inside must be the same age. This seems a heavy assumption, and I know enough about archaeology to know you can't always assume something found in one context is necessarily the same age as that context. It's rare to find something like a 3rd century good in a 5th century context (or vice versa), but not impossible. After all, I can still walk inside the Colosseum, and if I it and I were suddenly buried, future archaeologists would find a 21st century body in a 1st century building.

If a younger bacteria could be shown to make use of an older salt crystal, that pretty much blows the paper up, right?

3. Can DNA even last 250 Myrs to be sequenced accurately? I know they did this in Jurassic Park, but I was under the assumption this was more or less fantasy.

 

As a non-biologist, I wouldn't be surprised to be wrong on all these points, but as a skeptically minded individual, I'd be curious to see if I was at least thinking about things in the correct manner.

Spoiler

 

Apparently the age of the crystal did come under criticism as well, but I am not good enough to comment on that.

They conclude the crystal must have been containing bacteria of the same age because they weeded out any crystal with signs of recrystallization, alterations that would allow more recent bacteria from seeping in, and so on, but you are right, they can never be sure.

DNA can most certainly not last that long and be viable. It's very unstable and both the sequence gets lost (the bases are chemically altered) and the natural radiation breaks it down in smaller pieces. The real problem with their preposterous claim is that the bacteria must have been a spore (a dried up state bacteria enter to survive harsh conditions, in which no DNA repair can take place) and viable (i.e, able to come back to life). This implies a far far greater stability for this 250 million years old spore than even polyextremophiles like Deinococcus radiodurans.

Even in ideal conditions (spores of bacteria deep in the permafrost) DNA breaks down beyond any form of recovery (for sequencing purposes) after at the very most 2 million years (no fragment more than 120 base pair can be recovered). Viability is believed to disappear after a few hundred years. That's in part why "ressucitating ancient viruses in the permafrost" is just silly.

Now, for the phylogeny: they measured exactly two differences between their bacteria and the modern marismortui. This means, that, even if we are to believe that the permians bateria never changed its sequence and successfully resisted all mutations, marismortui accumulated only two differences in all that time.
Why not, maybe it's an increduble fluke?
Well, if we compare substitutions between different strains of marismortui the differences are greater.
If we stop fooling around and assume a rate of substitution for that gene similar to almost every other bacteria we obtain a divergence between permians and marismortui of 13,000–65,000 years.

Using other tests, Graur et al. (2001) showed that "Were we to accept the antiquity of B. permians, we would have to conclude that the number of substitutions accumulated by S. marismortui during 250 Myr of evolution is equal to that accumulated by B. permians during the 3–7 days of active replication in the laboratory following its rescue from a 250-Myr evolutionary slumber."

Now let's say we ditch the hypothesis that permians didn't change its sequence in all that time, how could we explain the lack of difference between marismortui and it? With an insultingly low probability of convergent evolution in very different environments. And that all the other branches of the phylogenetic tree are lying to us as well, because we would have to push all the dates of divergence back a few tens of millions of years back.

One of the co-authors in Vreeland (2002) suggested that maybe marismortui was also trapped for 250 million years and only recently somehow reemerged, thus explaining their closeness.
But using the same arguments as Graur, we have to conclude, ad infinitum, that ALL other lineages must have been trapped for this to be consistent.

Anyway, nobody would bother with that article if it wasn't published in Nature...

 

After my exams, I will post a phylogenetics tutorial retracing what they did as well as a few tests for different scenarios to really show it doesn't fit. Anyone interested should be able to follow it, I will provide the sequences and the software.

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Ugh, I really should do better at this. It's amazing how I can do so well on "tests" and then when a professor asks us to critically assess an article I'm at a total loss. At the risk of shaming my educational background, what irritated me the most is how they determined the aging of the bacteria. The whole, "the age of the rocks around it were 250 million years old and so the bacteria we "find" within it should also be that age," seemed pretty incredible. It seems most counter intuitive that either the bacteria or its DNA would maintain its structural integrity well enough to run a PCR or other such test to help determine its nucleotide base sequences, and if this alone would be "challenging" to pull off then by comparison actually growing the bacteria in a culture would be virtually impossible, and to such an extent that it's understandable why the OP would believe the article was worthy of criticism. 

As the results of their experiment suggests, even with extensive effort a fully "sterilized" lab environment is surprisingly difficult to accomplish. Autoclaving should do the trick but as soon as they mention the use of disinfectants on equipment it's tempting to say that it becomes considerably less full proof considering that there are a wide variety of disinfectants that won't fully inhibit the growth of all bacteria.

In terms of taxonomy, classification is difficult enough as it is with multi-cellular organisms; as fond as I am of the reproductive compatibility test to determine a species, this test is noticeably lacking with asexual organisms and it annoys me that an arbitrary threshold for "% of DNA that is similar" is often used to determine separate "species" of bacteria.

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2 minutes ago, Deprecator said:

In terms of taxonomy, classification is difficult enough as it is with multi-cellular organisms; as fond as I am of the reproductive compatibility test to determine a species, this test is noticeably lacking with asexual organisms and it annoys me that an arbitrary threshold for "% of DNA that is similar" is often used to determine separate "species" of bacteria.

This question is irrelevant to the criticism of their phylogeny. If anything, a bacterial phylogeny is pretty straightforward and easy to analyze.

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6 hours ago, slade19 said:

Now, for the phylogeny: they measured exactly two differences between their bacteria and the modern marismortui. This means, that, even if we are to believe that the permians bateria never changed its sequence and successfully resisted all mutations, marismortui accumulated only two differences in all that time.
Why not, maybe it's an increduble fluke?
Well, if we compare substitutions between different strains of marismortui the differences are greater.
If we stop fooling around and assume a rate of substitution for that gene similar to almost every other bacteria we obtain a divergence between permians and marismortui of 13,000–65,000 years.

Using other tests, Graur et al. (2001) showed that "Were we to accept the antiquity of B. permians, we would have to conclude that the number of substitutions accumulated by S. marismortui during 250 Myr of evolution is equal to that accumulated by B. permians during the 3–7 days of active replication in the laboratory following its rescue from a 250-Myr evolutionary slumber."

So if I understand this correctly, the basic point here is if they only found 2 differences between this and modern marismortui, it's more likely that it's because it is modern marismortui, rather than a different strain 250 Myr old that somehow has only evolved 2 differences in all that time.

Is that about right?

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6 minutes ago, Imperator said:

So if I understand this correctly, the basic point here is if they only found 2 differences between this and modern marismortui, it's more likely that it's because it is modern marismortui, rather than a different strain 250 Myr old that somehow has only evolved 2 differences in all that time.

Is that about right?

Yes, especially since different strains of marismortui have more differences between them than they have with permians.

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2 hours ago, slade19 said:

Yes, especially since different strains of marismortui have more differences between them than they have with permians.

I could almost smell the arrogance dripping from the article. It was written very much like they had discovered something fantastically important and revolutionary. If they're basically claiming the strain they found is radically different from everything we know about bacteria, I'd call that a "win" for my skepticism and bullshit detection skills.

Not bad for someone who hasn't opened a biology book since high school, no? :p

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1 minute ago, Imperator said:

I could almost smell the arrogance dripping from the article. It was written very much like they had discovered something fantastically important and revolutionary.

If they were right, it was the most ancient organism recovered alive.

The ones who criticized the article, like Graur et al. (2001) "The permian bacteria that isn't" were quite acerbic: "In this note, we apply the-proof-of-the-pudding-is-in-the-eating principle", "Notwithstanding the heroic contamination checks by Vreeland, Rosenzweig, and Powers (2000), which included microscopical examinations, alkali and acid sterilizations, and UV radiations, the pudding just tastes too fresh to be Permian, and B. permians is most probably destined to join the growing list of such purportedly Methuselan specimens as the Miocene magnolia (Golenberg et al. 1990 ), the Cretaceous weevil (Cano et al. 1993), and the would-be dinosaur (Woodward, Weyland, and Bunnell 1994 ), which turned out to be contemporary artifacts (Austin, Smith, and Thomas 1997 ; Walden and Robertson 1997 ; Gutiérrez and Marín 1998 )."

The most bitter criticism of a finding I can remember was "used the wrong definition wrongly" in the project ENCODE. Fun stuff.

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As a tangent, I think it's important to note that this paper passed peer-review, but peer-review does not mean "accepted fact" as a lot of people believe.

Peer-review means the paper has passed a minimum of scientific scrutiny and is therefore acceptable to be reviewed by the field at large.

It is the START of the scientific conversation on an issue, and this is a pretty good demonstration of how science is self-correcting -- hence the criticisms that have resulted.

I don't want to derail the thread talking about peer-review, but I found this a good opportunity to dispel that particular misconception -- especially since I've noticed a lot of users will simply cite a peer-reviewed article and leave it at that, as if citing an article in itself was all the proof needed for a given argument.

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Ok, as promised, here is the opportunity to redo exactly what the authors did, if you are interested in how phylogenies are made.

We will be using Seaview, which implements a variety of methods (some of the algorithms it uses are slightly modified from what they traditionally do, but I will say when it's the case).

Now, I went and took the sequences of the 16S rRNA they used to compare the bacterias. The idea behind using that gene specifically is that it is involved in the ribosome, a molecular machine for reading mRNA into proteins that is shared by all of Life and is vital, so it accumulates mutations very slowly.

Seaview works with a format called fasta. It's very easy, in spoilers are the sequences with >name-of-the-bacteria on top, and the sequence below, all you need to do is input it this way in a text editing software like notepad, then save the file with .fasta after.

When you open Seaview, you can just drag and drop the file in the window, it should take care of it on its own.

1-In Align, select Align all (click on ok when it finishes).

2-to retain only the parts that aligned well enough, go in Sites > Create Set > G blocks. Leave the defaults.

3-In Trees, you can start creating different phylogenies using your alignments (some of them are ultra fast, others very slow because they involve computing multiple trees.
In general, leave the defaults on, but when you see "bootstrap", you can set a certain number to it. A bootstrap is a way to get an idea of how robust your phylogeny is, i.e. it will resample sites in your alignment randomly and do the tree on that instead, and then give you for each branch, how often it was found (the higher the number for each branch, the more confident you are that your choice of sequences is not artifically skewing your tree). Since it means you recompute another tree, it can be very slow in some methods.

So, let's start with an obsolete method (the one Vreeland et al. used actually!): parsimony. It's very fast so you can set 100 or even a 1000 bootstrap, should be fast enough. The idea behind this method is Occam's razor: try and find the tree with the simplest evolutionary history, the fewest mutation events.
It sucks. It really does. It was our first method ever actually but it's just too simple to function properly and is completely blind to multiple substitution events, is unable to distinguish between different types of mechanisms, and overall, it just gives you cladograms like these:

250px-Identical_cladograms.svg.pngThe only thing you can analyse in those is the topology, what branches out of what.

You will notice that our tree incorporates the notion of distance into each branch, but that's an inferrence added by the algorithm we use, a parsimony method is, as I said, blind to such subtleties. The algorithms we found in that approach aren't even able to guarantee you that they found the absolute simplest tree. You can have fun and try and re-root the tree (i.e; setting the oldest speciation event yourself), and see the results of the bootstrap by selecting Branch support.

Oh, you will also find a three branched root, that's because the method also sucks at resolving such conflicts. I added the sequences that allow that to happen for demonstration purposes. Since the method isn't even optimal, and is instead heuristic, it may form a tri-branch with different sequences than mine.

Now for the next method, select Distance methods, NJ instead of BioNJ, and Observed, in Distance. The idea of that method is that it uses an evolution model (substitution matrix) that takes into account the various likelihoods and constraints every mutation is subjected to, so as to construct a much more credible tree. It also takes into account the possibility of multiple (hidden) substitutions happening at a specific site based on the context and the other sequences, and it is optimal (there is only one solution and it always finds it). Here, the model we used is "observed" i.e it infers the mutation model from the data set, but some theoretical/biochemical models exist, the most commonly used of which is Kimura (in the list of choices if you want to try).

Finally, we can try Maximum Likelihood (PhyML in the software) methods (only 10 bootstraps, it's extremely slow). That method starts from a distance based tree, then modifies it (mutates it) and recomputes the tree each time, trying to see if the tree we find is "likely" bayesianally speaking. It selects the likeliest to display. It's not optimal but very robust and can correct for the occurence of some flukes in the evolutionary history of those sequences.

You should find that L.casei is always the furthest out in the tree, that's intentional: it's a very different organism that we use to root the tree, i.e tell the algorithm which of the sequences it should use as outgroup.

In all of these trees, the "unknown" and "marismortui" are extremely close to each others and the distances between their sequences doesn't even compare to the ones of the other bacteria. If such a distance can happen in 250 million years, we can just give up on phylogeny altogether because we would be comparing apples and oranges each time.

Spoiler

>unknown
TGGAGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCG
AGCGCGGGAAGCAGGCAGATCCTCTTCGGAGGTGACNCTTGTGGAACGAGCGGCGGACGG
GTGAGTAACACGTGGGCAACCTGCCTGTAAGATTGGGATAACCCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTA
ATACCGGATAATACTTTTCGTTGCATAACGAGAAGTTGAAAGGCGGCTTTTAGCTGTCAC
TTACAGATGGGCCCGCGGCGCATTAGCTAGTTGGTAAGGTAACGGCTTACCAAGGCGACG
ATGCGTAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTC
CTACGGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCC
GCGTGAGTGATGAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAAAACTCTGTTGTCAGGGAAGAACAAGTGCCG
TTCAAATAGGGCGGCACCTTGACGGTACCTGACCAGAAAGCCCCGGCTAACTACGTGCCA
GCAGCCGCGGTAATACGTAGGGGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGC
GCAGGCGGTCCTTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCACGGCTTAACCGTGGAGGGCCATTGGA
AACTGGAGGACTTGAGTACAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCG
TAGAGATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAG
GTGCGAAAGCGTGGGAGCGAACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATG
AGTGCTAGGTGTTAGGGGGTTTCCGCCCCTTAGTGCTGAAGTTAACGCATTAAGCACTCC
GCCTGGGGAGTACGGCCGCAAGGCTGAAACTCAAAAGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGC
GGTGGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAGCAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCT
CTGCCAATCCTAGAGATAGGATGTTCCCTTCGGGGACAGAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTT
GTCGTCAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGATC
TTAGTTGCCAGCATTTAGTTGGGCACTCTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAG
GTGGGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCCCCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATG
GATGGAACAAAGGGCAGCGAAGCCGYGAGGTCAAGCAAATCCCATAAAACCATTCTCAGT
TCGGATTGCAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTGCATGAAGCCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAG
CATGCCGCGGTGAATACGTTCCCGGGCCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTT
GGTAACACCCGAAGTCGGTGAGGTAACCTTTTGGAGCCAGCCGCCGAAGGTGGGACCAAT
GATTGGGGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTATCGGAAGGTGCGGNTGGATCACCTCCTT
>B.marismortui
GAGAGTTTGATCATGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCGAG
CGCGGGAAGCAGGCAGATCCTCTTCGGAGGTGACGCCTGTGGAACGAGCGGCGGACGGGT
GAGTAACACGTGGGCAACCTGCCTGTAAGATTGGGATAACCCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAAT
ACCGGATAATACTTTTCGTTGCATAACGAGAAGTTGAAAGGCGGCTTTTAGCTGTCACTT
ACAGATGGGCCCGCGGCGCATTAGCTAGTTGGTAAGGTAACGGCTTACCAAGGCGACGAT
GCGTAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCT
ACGGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGC
GTGAGTGATGAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAAAACTCTGTTGTCAGGGAAGAACAAGTGCCGTT
CAAATAGGGCGGCACCTTGACGGTACCTGACCAGAAAGCCCCGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGC
AGCCGCGGTAATACGTAGGGGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGCGC
AGGCGGTCCTTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCACGGCTTAACCGTGGAGGGCCATTGGAAA
CTGGAGGACTTGAGTACAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTA
GAGATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGT
GCGAAAGCGTGGGGAGCGAACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGA
GTGCTAGGTGTTAGGGGGTTTCCGCCCCTTAGTGCTGAAGTTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCG
CCTGGGGAGTACGGCCGCAAGGCTGAAACTCAAAAGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCG
GTGGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAGCAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTC
TGCCAATCCTAGAGATAGGATGTTCCCTTCGGGGACAGAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTG
TCGTCAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGATCT
TAGTTGCCAGCATTTAGTTGGGCACTCTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGG
CGGGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCCCCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGG
ATGGAACAAAGGGCAGCGAAGCCGCGAGGTCAAGCAAATCCCATAAAACCATTCTCAGTT
CGGATTGCAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTGCATGAAGCCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGC
ATGCCGCGGTGAATACGTTCCCGGGCCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTG
GTAACACCCGAAGTCGGTGAGGTAACCTTTTGGAGCCAGCCGCCGAAGGTGGGACCAATG
ATTGGGGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTATCGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCTTT
CTG
>V.proomii
GCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCGAGCGCGGGAAGCAAGCAGAACCCCTTCGGGGGTG
ACGCATGTGGAACGAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACACGTGGGCAACCTGCCTGTAAGACT
GGGATAACTCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACCGGATAATACGTTTTCTTGCATAAGGAGAC
GTTAAAAGGCGGCGCAAGCTGTCACTTACAGATGGGCCCGCGGCGCATTAGCTAGTTGGT
GGGGTAAAAGCCTACCAAGGCGACGATGCGTAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACAC
TGGGACTGAGACACRGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATG
GACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGAGTGAAGAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAAAACTC
TGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTGCCGTTCAAATAGGGCGGCACCTTGACGGTACCTAACCA
GAAAGCCCCGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTAATACGTAGGGGGCAAGCGTTGTC
CGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGCGCAGGCGGTCTTTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCAC
GGCTTAACCGTGGAGGGCCATTGGAAACTGGAGGACTTGAGTACAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGA
ATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCGAC
TCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGTGCGAAAGCGTGGGTAGCGAACAGGATTAGATAC
CCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGCTAGGTGTTAGGGGGTTTCCGCCCCTTAGT
GCTGCAGTTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGTACGGCCGCAAGGCTGAAACTCAA
AAGAATTGACGGGGACCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAGCAACGCGA
AGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTCTGACGGCCCTAGAGATAGGGAGTTCCCTTCGGG
GACAGAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAG
TCCCGCAACNAGCGCAACCCTTGATCTTANTTGCCAGCATTCAGTTGGGCACTCTAAGGT
GACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCCCCTTATG
ACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGATGGAACAAAGGGCAGCGAAGCCGTGAGGCCAA
GCAAATCCCACAAAACCATTCTCAGTTCGGATTGCAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTGCATGAAGC
CGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGTGAATACGTTCCCGGGTCTTGTAC
ACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTGGTAACACCCGAAGTCGGTGAGGTAACCGTAAGG
AGCCAGCCGCCGAAGGTGGGACCAATGATTGGGGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTANCCGTATC
GGAAGG
>Gracilibacillus
TCCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCGAGCGCGGGAAGC
AAACCGATTCCTTCGGGATGAAGTTTGTGGAACGAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACACGTG
GGCAACCTACCTGTAAGACTGGGATAACTCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACCGGATAGAGT
TTCCTCTCGCATGAGAGGAATCGGAAAGGCGGCTTCGGCTGTCACTTACAGATGGGCCCG
CGGCGCATTAGCTAGTTGGTGGGGTAATGGCTCACCAAGGCAACGATGCGTAGCCGACCT
GAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCA
GTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGAACGAAGAAG
GTTTTCGGATCGTAAAGTTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTACCGTTTGAATAAGGCGGT
ACCTTGACGGTACCTATCGAGGAAGCCCCGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTAATA
CGTAGGGGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGCGTAGGCGGTTTCTTA
AGTCTGATGTGAAATCTTGCGGCTCAACCGCAAGCGGTCATTGGAAACTGGGGAACTTGA
GTGCAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATGTGGAGGA
ACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGTGCGAAAGCGTGGG
TAGCGAACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGCTAGGTGTTA
GGGGGTTTCCGCCCCTTAGTGCTGGAGTTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGTACG
GCCGCAAGGCTGAAACTCAAAAGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTGG
TTTAATTCGAAGCAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCTTTGGCCATCTCTAGA
GATAGAGAGTTCCCTTCGGGGACCAAATGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTCGTG
TCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGATCTTAGTTGCCAGCAT
TAAGTTGGGCACTCTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGACGTC
AAATCATCATGCCCCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGATGGTACAGAGGG
CAGCGAAGCCGCGAGGTGAAGCAAATCCCATAAAACCATTCTCAGTTCGGATTGCAGGCT
GCAACTCGCCTGCATGAAGCCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGTGGATCAGCATGCCACGGTGAA
TACGTTCCCGGGCCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTGGCAACACCCGAAG
TCGGTGTGGTAACCTTTATGGAGCCAGCCGCCGAAGGTGGGGCCAATGATTGGGGTGAAG
TCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTATCGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCAC
>G.dipsosauri
GCGGGAAGCTGACTGAATCCTTCGGGAGGACGTGAGTGGAACGAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAG
TAACACGTGGGCAACCTGCCTGTAAGACTGGGATAACTCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACC
GGATAGTACTTTGGTTCATAGGAACCGAAGTGGAAAGGTGGCGCAAGCTACCACTTACAG
ATGGGCCCGCGGTGCATTAGCTAGTTGGTGAGGTAACGGCTCACCAAGGCAACGATGCAT
AGCCGACCTGAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTACGG
GAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGA
ACGAAGAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAAAGTTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTACCGTTCGAA
TAGGGCGGTACCTTGACGGTACCTATCGAGGAAGCCCCGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCC
GCGGTAATACGTAGGGGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGCGTAGGC
GGTTTCTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAATCTTGCGGCTCAACCGCAAGCGGTCATTGGAAACTGG
GGAACTTGAGTACAGAAGAGGAGAGCGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGA
TGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCGCCTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGTCCGA
AAGCGTGGGGAGCGAACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGC
TAAGTGTTAGGGGGTTTCCGCCCCTTAGTGCTGCAGTTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTG
GGGAGTACGNCCGCAGCGGCGAAACTCAAAAGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGTGG
AGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAGCCACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCTTCGGAT
GTCCCTAGAGATAGGGAGTTCCCTTCGGGGACCGAATGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTNGTCGT
CAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGATCTTAGT
TGCCAGCATTCAGTTGGGCACTCTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGG
GATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCCCCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGATGG
TACAAAGGGCAGCGAAGCCGTGAGGTGAAGCCAATCCCATAAAACCATTCTCAGTTCGGA
TTGTAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTACATGAAGCCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGC
CGCGGTGAATACGTNCCCGGGCCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTGGCAA
CACCCGAAGTCG
>H.litoralis
CAGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCGAG
CGCGGGAAGCGAGTGGCTCCCTTCGGGGTGAAGCTCGTGGAACGAGCGGCGGACGGGTGA
GTAACACGTGGGCAACCTGCCTGTAAGACCGGAATAACCCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATGC
CGGGTAATACTTTTCTTCGCATGAAGGAAAGTTGAAAGATGGCTTCTTGCTATCACTTAC
AGATGGGCCCGCGGCGCATTAGCTAGTTGGTGAGGTAACGGCTCACCAAGGCGACGATGC
GTAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTAC
GGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGT
GAACGATGAAGGTCTTCGGATCGTAAAGTTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTACCGTGCG
AATAGAGCGGTACCTTGACGGTACCTAACGAGGAAGCCCCGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAG
CCGCGGTAATACGTAGGGGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGCGCAG
GCGGTTCCTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCACGGCTCAACCGTGGAGGGTCATTGGAAACT
GGGGAACTTGAGGACAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGA
TATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTTTCTGACGCTGAGGTGC
GAAAGCGTGGGTAGCAAACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGT
GCTAGGTGTTAGGGGGCTTCCACCCCTTAGTGCTGAAGTTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCC
TGGGGAGTACGGCCGCAAGGCTGAAACTCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGT
GGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAGCAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTTGG
ACCACCCTAGAGATAGGGTTTTCCTTCGGGGACCAAGGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTC
GTCAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCCTAATCTTA
GTTGCCAGCATTCAGTTGGGCACTCTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGCG
GGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCCCCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGAT
GGAACAAAGGGCAGCGAAGCCGCGAGGTGTAGCAAATCCCATAAAACCATTCTCAGTTCG
GATTGCAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTGCATGAAGCCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCAT
GCCGCGGTGAATACGTTCCCGGGCCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTGGC
AACACCCGAAGTCGGTGAGGTAACCTTTTTGGAGCCAGCCGCCGAAGGTGGGGCCAATGA
TTGGGGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTATCGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCTTT
>S.halophila
GGAGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCGA
GCGCGGGAAGCAAGCGGATCCTTCGGGGGTGAAGCTTGTGGAACGAGCGGCGGACGGGTG
AGTAACACGTGGGCAACCTGCCTGTAAGACCGGAATAACCCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATG
CCGNGTAACACCTACCTTCACCTGAAGGAAGGTTAAAAGATGGCTTCTCGCTATCACTTA
CAGATGGGCCCGCGGCGATTAGCTAGTTGGTGAGGTAATAGCTCACCAAGGCGACGATGC
GTAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTAC
GGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGGAACGCCGCGT
GAACGATGAAGGTCTTCGGATCGTAAAGTTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTACCGTACG
AACACAGCGGTACCTTGACGGTACCTAACGAGGAAGCCCCGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAG
CCGCGGTAATACGTAGGGGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGCGCAG
GCGGTTCTTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCACGGCTCAACCGTGGAGGGTCATTGGGAAAC
TGGGGAACTTGAGGACAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAG
ATACGTGGAGGAACACCAGAGGCGAAGGCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTTTCTGACGCTGAGGTG
CGAAAGCGTGGGTAGCAAACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAG
TGCTAGGTGTTAGGGGGCTTCCACCCCTTAGTGCTGAAGTTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGC
CTGGGGAGTACGGCCGCAAGGNTGAAACTCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGG
TGGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAGCAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTTG
GACCACCCTAGAGATAGGTGCTTCTTCGGGGACCAAGGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTC
GTCAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCCTAATCTTA
GTTGCCAGCATTCAGTTGGGCACTCTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGCG
GGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCCCCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGAT
GGTACAAAGGGCAGCGAAGCCGCGAGGTGTAGCAAATCCCATAAAACCATTCTCAGTTCG
GATTGCAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTGCATGAAGCCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCAT
GCCGCGGTGAATACGTTCCCGGGTCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTGGC
AACACCCGAAGTCGGTGAGGTAACCTTTATGGAGCCAGCCGCCGAAGGTGG
>M.albus
CGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCGAGCGCGGGAAGCGAGCAGAAGCCCTTCGGGGTGGA
CGCTCGTGGAACGAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACACGTGGGCAACCTGCCTGTAAGACCG
GAATAACCCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATGCCGGATAACCCAACGGTTCTCCTGAACCGATG
GTAAAAGGATGGCTTCTTGCTATCGCTTACAGATGGGCCCGCGGCGCATTAGCTGGTTGG
TGAGGTAACGGCTCACCAAGGCGACGATGCGTAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACA
CTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAAT
GGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGGAACGCCGCGTGAATGATGAAGGTCTTCGGATCGTAAAATT
CTGTTGTGAGGGAAGAACAAGGACGGTACGAACACAGCGGTACCTTGACGGTACCTAACG
AGGAAGCCCCGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTAATACGTAGGGGGCAAGCGTTGT
CCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGCGCAGGCGGTTCTTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCA
CGGCTCAACCGTGGAGGGTCATTGGGAAACTGGGGAACTTGAGGACAGAAGAGGAGAGTG
GAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGATATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCG
ACTCTCTGGTCGGTTTCTGACGCTGAGGTGCGAAAGCGTGGGTAGCAAACAGGATTAGAT
ACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGCTGAGTGCTAGGTGTTAGGGGGCTTCCACCCCTTA
GTGCTGAAGTTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGTACGGCCGCAAGGCTGAAACTC
AAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAGCAACGC
GAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTTGGCTACTTCCAGAGATGGAAGGTTCCCTTCG
GGGACCAAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTA
AGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCCTAATCTTAGTTGCCAGCATTCAGTTGGGCACTCTAAG
GTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGCGGGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCCCCTTA
TGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGATGGGACAAACGGAAGCGAACCCGCGAGGGG
TAGCCAATCCGAGAAACCATTCTCAGTTCGGATTGCAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTGCATGAAG
CCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGAGATCAGCATGCTGCGGTGAATACGTTCCCGGGCCTTGT
ACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTGGCAACACCCGAAGCCGGTGAGGTAACCTTTA
CNGGAGCCAGCCGTCGAAGGTGGGGCCAATGATTGGGGTGAAGTCGTAA
>B.salexigens
GGGNCGAACNCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCGAGCGCGGGAAGCAGGCAGACT
TNNCGGGAGTGATGCCTGTGGAACGAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACACGTGGGCAACCTG
CCTGTAAGACTGGGATAACCCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACCGGATAACACTTTTTGTAC
ATGCAAGAAGTTGAAAGGCGGCCTTTTTGGCTGTCACTTACAGATGGGCCCGCGGCGCAT
TAGCTAGTTGGTAGGGTAACGGCCTACCAAGGCAACGATGCGTAGCCGACCCGAGAGGGT
GATCGGCCACACTGGGACTAAGAAAGGGCCAANNCTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCAGTGGGGAA
CCGACCTCAANAGACGAAAGNCCGACGGAGCAACNCGCTGAGTATGAAGGTTTTTGGATC
GTAAAACTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTGCCGTTCAAATAGGGCGGCACCTTGACGGT
ACCTAACCAGAAAGCCCCGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTAATACGTAGGGGGCA
AGNGTTGTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGCGCAAGGGGTCCCTTAAGTCTGATGTG
AAAGCCCACGGTTCAACCGTGGATGGCCATTGGAAACTGGAGGACTTGAGTACAGAAGGG
GAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATGTCGAGGAACACCAGTNGC
GAAGGCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGTGCGAAAGCGTGGGGAGCGAACAGG
ATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGTTGAGTGCTAGGTGTTAGGGGGTTTCCG
CCCTTAGTGCTGAAGTTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGTACGGCCGCAAGCTGA
AACTCAAAAGAATTNACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTAGTTTAATTCGAAGC
AACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTCTGACACCCCTAGAGATAGGGCATTCC
CTTCGGGGACAGAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTG
GGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGATCTTAGTTGCCAGCATTGAGTTGGGCACT
CTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCC
CCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGATGGAACAAAGGGCAGCGAAACCGCA
AGGTCAAGCAAATCCCATAAANCCATTCTCAGTTCGGATTGCAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTCA
TGAGCCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGTGAATACGTTCCCGGGCCT
TGTACACACCGCCGTACAACANNGAGAGTTGGTAACACCCGAAGTCGGTGAGGTAACCTT
TTGGAGCCAGCCGCCGAAGGTGGGACCAATGATTGGGGTNAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAANCG
TATCGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCTTTCT
>B.marinus
CCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCGAGCGGAGTTAGAG
AAGCTTGCTTCTCTAACTTAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACACGTGGGCAATCTGCCCGTA
AGACTGGGATAACTCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACCGGATAATCCTGACTCTCTCCTGAG
AGTCAGTTGAAAGATGGTTTCGGCTATCACTTACGGATGAGCCCGCGGCGCATTAGCTAG
TTGGTGAGGTAACGGCTCACCAAGGCGACGATGCGTAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGTGATCGGC
CACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAATCTTCCG
CAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGAGTGAAGAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAA
AACTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACACGTACGAGAGTAACTGCTCGTACCTTGACGGTACCTA
ACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTAATACGTAGGTGGCAAGCGT
TGTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGCGCAGGTGGTTCCTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGC
CCCCGGCTCAACCGGGGAGGGTCATTGGAAACTGGGGAACTTGAGTGCAGGAGAGGAAAG
TGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGATATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAGG
CGACTTTCTGGCCTGTAACTGACACTGAGGCGCGAAAGCGTGGGGAGCAAACAGGATTAG
ATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGCTAAGTGTTGGGGGGTTTCCGCCCCT
CAGTGCTGCAGCTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGTACGGCCGCAAGGCTGAAAC
TCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAGCAAC
GCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCCATTGCCCGGTCTAGAGATAGACTTTTCCCT
TCGGGGACAATGGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGG
GTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGATCTTAGTTGCCAGCATTTAGTTGGGCACTC
TAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCCC
CTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGACGATACAAAGGGCAGCGAGACCGCGA
GGTGGAGCCAATCCCATAAAATCGTTCTCAGTTCGGATTGTAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTACA
TGAAGCTGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGTGAATACGTTCCCGGGCC
TTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTTGTAACACCCGAAGTCGGTGGGGTAACC
ATTTGGAGCCAGCCGCCTAAGGTGGGACCGATGATTGGGGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGC
CGTATCGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGAT
>B.circulans
TTGATCCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTNATACATGCAAGTCGAGCGGACT
TTAAAAGCTTGCTNTTNAAGTNAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACACGTGGGCAACCTGCCT
GTAAGACTGGGATAACTTCGGGAAACCGGAGCTNATACCGGATNATCCTNTTCCTCTCAT
GAGGAAAAGCTGAAAGACGGTTTACGCTGTCACTTACAGATGGGCCCGCGGCGCATTAGC
TAGTTGGTGAGGTAACGGCTCACCAAGGCGACGATGCGTAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGTGATC
GGCNACNCTGGGACTGAGACNCGGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAATCTT
CCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCNACGCCGCGTGAGTGATGAAGGTNNTCGGATCG
TAAAACTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTACNAGAGTNACTNCTGGTGCCTNGACGGTAC
CTNACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTAATACGTAGGTGGCNAG
CGTTNTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTNAAGCGCGCGCAGGCGGTCCTNNNAGTCTNATGTGAA
AGCCCACGGCTNAACCGTGGAGGGTCATTGGAAACTGGGGNACTNGAGTGCAGAAGAGAA
GAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGA
AGGCGACTNTNTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGCGCGAAAGCGTGGGGAGCAAACAGGAT
TAGATACCCTNGTAGTCCACGCCGTNAACGATGAGTGCTNAGTGTTAGAGGGTTTCCGCC
CNNTAGTGCTGCAGCAAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGTACGGCCGCAAGGCTNA
AACTCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAGNA
ACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTCTGACACTCCTAGAGATAGGACGTNNTC
GGGGNACAGAGTGACAGGTGGNGCATGGTNGTCGTCAGCTNGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGGT
TAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTNGATCTTAGTTGCCAGCATTCAGTTGGGCACTCTA
AGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCCCCT
TATGACCTNGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGATGGTACAAAGGGCAGCAAAACCGCGAGG
TCGAGCAAATCCCATAAAACCATTCTCAGTTCGGATTGTAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTACATG
AAGCTGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGTGAATACGTTCCCGGGCNTT
GTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTTGTAACACCC
>B.megaterium
TTGATCCTGGCTCAGGATNAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTNGAGCGAACT
NATTAGAAGCTTGCTTCTATGACGTNAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTNACACGTGGGCAACCT
GCCTGTAAGACTGGGATAACTTCGGGAAACCGAAGCTAATACCGGATAGGATCTTCTCCT
TCATGGGAGATGATTGAAAGATGGTTTCGGCTATCACTTACAGATGGGCCCGCGGTGCAT
TAGCTNGTTGGTGAGGTAACGGCTCACCAAGGCAACGATGCATAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGT
NATNGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAA
TCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGAGTGATGAAGGCTNTCGG
GTCGTAAAACTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTACNAGAGTAACTNCTNGTNCCTTGACG
GTACCTAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTNATACGTAGGTGG
CAAGCGTNATCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTNAAGCGCGCGCAGGCGGTTTCTTAAGTCTNATG
TGAAAGCCCACGGCTNAACCGTNGAGGGTCATTGGAAACTGGGGAACTNGAGTGCAGAAG
AGAAAAGCGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTNAAATGCGTAGAGATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTG
GCGAAGGCGNCTNTNTNGTCTGTAACTGACGCTNAGGCGCGNAAGCGTGGGGAGCAAACA
GGATTAGATACCCTGGTNGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGCTAAGTGTTAGAGGGTTTC
CGCCCTNTAGTGCTNCACTAACGCATNAAGCACTNCGCCTNGGGAGTACGGTCGCAAGAC
TNAAACTCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTNGTTTAATTCGAA
GNAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTNGACATCCTCTGACAACTCTAGAGATAGAGNGTT
CCTTCGGGGNACAGAGTGACAGGTGGNGCATNGTNGTCGTCAGCTNGTGTCGTGAGATGT
TGGGTNAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGATCTTAGTTGCCAGCATTCAGTNGGGCA
CTCTAAGGTNACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATG
CCCCTTATGACCTNGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGATGGTACAAAGGGCTGCAAGACCG
CGAGGTNAAGCCAATCCCATNAAACCATNCTCAGTTCGGATNGTAGGCTGCAACTCGCCT
NCATGAAGCTNGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGTNAATACGTTCCCGG
GCCTNGTACACACCGCNCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTTGTAACACCC
>B.subtilis
TTGATCCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCGAGCGGACA
GATGGGAGCTTGCTCCCTGATGTTAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACACGTGGGTAACCTGC
CTGTAAGACTGGGATAACTCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACCGGATGGTTGTTTGAACCGC
ATGGTTCAAACATAAAAGGTGGCTTCGGCTACCACTTACAGATGGACCCGCGGCGCATTA
GCTAGTTGGTGAGGTAACGGCTCACCAAGGCAACGATGCGTAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGTGA
TCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAATC
TTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGAGTGATGAAGGTTTTCGGAT
CGTAAAGCTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTACCGTTCGAATAGGGCGGTACCTTGACGG
TACCTAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTAATACGTAGGTGGC
AAGCGTTNTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGGGCTCGCAGGCGGTTTCTTAAGTCTGATGT
GAAAGCCCCCGGCTCAACCGGGGAGGGTCATTGGAAACTGGGGAACTTGAGTGCAGAAGA
GGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTNGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGG
CGAAGGCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGAGCGAAAGCGTGGGGAGCGAACAG
GATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGCTAAGTGTTAGGGGGTTTCC
GCCCCTTAGTGCTGCAGTAACGCATTNAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGTACGGTCGCAAGACT
GAAACTCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAG
CAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTCTGACAATCCTAGAGATAGGACGTCT
TCGGGGGCAGAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGG
TTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTGGATCTTAGTTGCCAGCATTCAGTTGGGCACTCT
AAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCCCC
TTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGACAGAACAAAGGGCAGCGAAACCGCGAG
GTTAAGCCAATCCCACAAATCTGTTCTCAGTTCGGATCGCAGTCTGCAACTCGACTGCGT
GAAGCTGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGTGAATACGTTCCCGGGCCT
TGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTTGTAACACCC
>BACSUCG.RRNA
TTTATCGGAGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCA
AGTCGAGCGGACAGATGGGAGCTTGCTCCCTGATGTTAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACAC
GTGGGTAACCTGCCTGTAAGACTGGGATAACTCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACCGGATGG
TTGTTTGAACCGCATGGTTCAAACATAAAAGGTGGCTTCGGCTACCACTTACAGATGGAC
CCGCGGCGCATTAGCTAGTTGGTGAGGTAACGGCTCACCAAGGCGACGATGCGTAGCCGA
CCTGAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGCA
GCAGTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGAGTGATG
AAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAAAGCTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTACCGTTCGAATAGGGC
GGTACCTTGACGGTACCTAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTA
ATACGTAGGTGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGGGCTCGCAGGCGGTTTC
TTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCCCGGCTCAACCGGGGAGGGTCATTGGAAACTGGGGAACT
TGAGTGCAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATGTGGA
GGAACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGAGCGAAAGCGT
GGGGAGCGAACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGCTAAGTG
TTAGGGGGTTTCCGCCCCTTAGTGCTGCAGCTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGT
ACGGTCGCAAGACTGAAACTCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATG
TGGTTTAATTCGAAGCAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTCTGACAATCCT
AGAGATAGGACGTCCCCTTCGGGGGCAGAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTC
GTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGATCTTAGTTGCCAG
CATTCAGTTGGGCACTCTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGAC
GTCAAATCATCATGCCCCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGACAGAACAAA
GGGCAGCGAAACCGCGAGGTTAAGCCAATCCCACAAATCTGTTCTCAGTTCGGATCGCAG
TCTGCAACTCGACTGCGTGAAGCTGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGT
GAATACGTTCCCGGGCCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTTGTAACACCCG
AAGTCGGTGAGGTAACCTTTTAGGAGCCAGCCGCCGAAGGTGGGACAGATGATTGGGGTG
AAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTATCGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCTTTCT
>BACSUCG.RRND
ATTTATCGGAGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGC
AAGTCGAGCGGACAGATGGGAGCTTGCTCCCTGATGTTAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACA
CGTGGGTAACCTGCCTGTAAGACTGGGATAACTCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACCGGATG
GTTGTTTGAACCGCATGGTTCAAACATAAAAGGTGGCTTCGCTTACCAATTACAGATGGC
CCCGCGGCGCATTAGCTAGTTGGTGAGGTAACGGCTCACCAAGGCAACGATGCGTAGCCG
ACCTGAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGC
AGCAGTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGAGTGAT
GAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAAAGCTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTACCGTTCGAATAGGG
CGGTACCTTGACGGTACCTAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGT
AATACGTAGGTGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGGGCTCGCAGGCGGTTT
CTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCCCGGCTCAACCGGGGAGGGTCATTGGAAACTGGGGAAC
TTGAGTGCAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATGTGG
AGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGAGCGAAAGCG
TGGGGAGCGAACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGCTAAGT
GTTAGGGGGTTTCCGCCCCTTAGTGCTGCAGCTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAG
TACGGTCGCAAGACTGAAACTCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCAT
GTGGTTTAATTCGAAGCAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTCTGACAATCC
TAGAGATAGGACGTCCCCTTCGGGGGCAGAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCT
CGTGTCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTGCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGATCTTAGTTGCCA
GCATTCAGTTGGGCACTCTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGA
CGTCAAATCATCATGCCCCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGACAGAACAA
AGGGCAGCGAACCGCGAGGTTAAGCCAATCCCACAAATCTGTTCTCAGTTCGGATCGCAG
TCTGCAACTCGACTGCGTGAAGCTGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGT
GAATACGTTCCCGGGCCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTTGTAACACCCG
AAGTCGGTGAGGTAACCTTTTAGGAGCCAGCCGCCGAAGGTGGGACAGATGATTGGGGTG
AAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTATCGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCTTTCTA
>BACSUCG.RRNB
TTTATCGGAGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTAATACATGCA
AGTCGAGCGGACAGGTGGGAGCTTGCTCCGATGTTAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACACGT
GGGTAACCTGCCTGTAAGACTGGGATAACTCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACCGGATGGTT
GTTTGAACCGCATGGTTCAAACATAAAAGGTGGCTTCGGCTACCACTTACAGATGGACCC
GCGGCGCATTAGCTAGTTGGTGAGGTAACGGCTCACCAAGGCAACGATGCGTAGCCGACC
TGAGAGGGTGATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGC
AGTAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGAGTGATGAA
GGTTTTCGGATCGTAAAGCTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACAAGTACCGTTCGAACAGGGCGG
TACCTTGACGGTACCTAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTAAT
ACGTAGGTGGCAAGCGTTTTCCGGAATTATTGGGCGTAAAGGGCTCGCAGGCGGTTTCTT
AAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCCCGGCTCAACCGGGGAGGGTCATTGGAAACTGGGGAACTTG
AGTGCAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATGTGGAG
GAACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGAGCGAAAGCGTG
GGGAGCGAACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGCTAAGTGT
TAGGGGGTTTCCGCCCCTTAGTGCTGCAGCTAACGCATTGAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGTA
CGGTCGCAAGACTGAAACTCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGT
GGTTTAATTCGAAGCAACGCGAAGAACCTTACTAGGTCTTGACATCCTCTGACAATCCTA
GAGATAGGACGTCCCCTTCGGGGCAGAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTCGT
GTCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGATCTTAGTTGCCAGCA
TTCAGTTGGGCACTCTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGACGT
CAAATCATCATGCCCCTTATGACTTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGACAGAACAAAGG
GCAGCGAACCGCGAGGTTAAGCCAATCCCACAAATCTGTTCTCAGTTCGGATCGCAGTCT
GCAACTCGACTGCGTGAAGCTGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGTGAA
TACGTTCCCGGGCCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTTGTAACACCCGAAG
TCGGTGAGGTAACCTTTTAGGAGCCAGCCGCCGAAGGTGGGACAGATGATTGGGGTGAAG
TCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTATCGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCTTTCT
>B.coagulans
TNGATCCTGGCTCAGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTNATACNTGCAAGTCGTGCGGACC
TTTTAAAAGCTTGCTTTTAAAAGGTTAGCGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACACGTGGGCAACCT
GCCTGTAAGACNGGGATAACGCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACCNGATAGTTTTTTCCTCC
GCATGGAGGAAAAAGGAAAGGCGGCTTCGGCTGCCACTTACAGATGGGCCCGCGGCGCAT
TAGCTAGTTGGCGGGGTAACGGCCCACCAAGGCNACGATGCGTAGCCGACCTGAGAGGGT
GATCGGCCACATTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCANACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCAGTAGGGAA
TCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGAGTGAAGAAGGCCTTCGG
GTCGTAAAACTCTGTTGCCGGGGAAGAACAAGTGCCGTTCGAACAGGGCGGCGCCTTGAC
GGTACCCNNCCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTNATACGNAGGTG
GCNAGCGTTGTCCGGAATNNTTGGGCGTNAAGCGCGCGCNGGCGGCTNCTNNAGTCTGAT
GTGAAATCTTGCGGCTCAACCAAGCGGTCNTTGGAAACTGGGAGGCTTGAGTGCNGAAGA
GGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGG
CGAAGGCGGCTCTCTNGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGCGCGAAAGCGTGGNNAGCNAACAG
GATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGCTAAGTGTTAGAGGGTTTCC
GCCCTTTAGTGCTGCACTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGTACGGCCGCAAGGCT
GAAACTCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGAAG
CAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTCTGACCTCCCTGGAGACAGGGCCTTC
TTCGGGGGACAGAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTCGTGTCGTGAGATGTTG
GGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTGACCTTAGTTGCCAGCATTGAGTTGGGCACT
CTAAGGTGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGACGTCAAATCATCATGCC
CCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGATGGTACAAAGGGCTGCGAGACCGCG
AGGTTNAGCCAATCCCAGAAAACCATTCCCAGTTCGGATTGCAGGCTGCAACCCGCCTGC
ATGAAGCCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGTNAATACGTTCCCGGGC
NTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCNCACCACGAGAGTTTGTAACACCC
>B.pantothenticus
TTGATCTTGGCTCNGGACGAACGCTGGCGGCGTGCCTNATACATGCAAGTCGAGCGCGGG
AAGCAAGCAGATCTCCTTCGGGGGTGACGCTTGTCCAACGGACGGGTGAGTAACACGTGG
GCAACCTACCTGTAAGACTGGGATAACTCCGGGAAACCGGGGCTAATACCGGATGATACA
TATCGTCGCATGACGAGATGTTGAAAGGCGGCATATGCTGTCACTTACAGATGGGCCCGC
GGCGCNTTAGCTNGTTGGTGAGATNAAAGCTCACCAAGGCGNCGATGCGTAGCCGACCTG
AGAGGGTNATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCNG
TAGGGAATCTTCCGCAATGGACGAAAGTCTGACGGAGCNACGCCGCGTGAGTGATGAAGG
TNTTCGGATCGTNAAACTCTGTTGTTAGGGAAGAACNAGTGCCATTCGAATNGGTTGGCA
CCTNGACGGTACCTNACCNGAAAGCCCCGGCTNACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTNATAC
GTAGGGGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGAATTNTTGGGCGTNAAGCGCGCGCNGGCGGTCCTTTAA
GTCTNATGTGAAAGCCCACGGCTNAACCGTGGAGGGCCNTTGGAAACTGGGGGACTTGAG
TNCNGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCCACGTGTNGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATGTGGAGGAA
CNCCNGTGGCGAAGGCGACTCTCTNGTCTGTNACTGACGCTNAGGTGCGAAAGCGTGGGN
AGCGAACAGGATTAGATACCCTNGTAGTCCACGCCGTNAACGATGAGTGCTAGGTGTTAN
GGGGTTTCNGCCCCTTAGTGCTNAAGTNAACGCNTTAAGCACTCCGCCTNGGGAGTACGG
CCGCAAGGCTNAAACTCNAAAGAATTGACGGGGGACCGCACNAGCGGTGGAGCNTGTGGT
TTNATTCGAAGCAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACNTCCTCTGACGCCCCTAGAG
ATAGGGNGTTCTTCGGGGACAGAGTGACNGGTGGNGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTCGTGTCG
TGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCNACCCTTGATCTTAGTTGCCAGCATTTA
GTTGGGCACTCTAAGGTNACTGCCGGTGACNAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGATGACGTCNAA
TCATCATGCCCCTTATGACCNNGGCTACACACGTGCTACNATGGATGGAACNAAGGGCNG
CGAAGCCGCGAGGCCAAGCNAATCCCATNAAACCNTTCTCNGTTCGGATTGCAGGCTGCN
ACTCGCCTGCATGAAGCCGGAATCGCTNGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGTNAATAC
GTTCCCGGGTNTTGTACACACCGCNCGTCACACCACGAGAGTTGG
>L.casei
GANGCAACGCTTGCCGCGTGCCTAATACATGCAAGTCGAACGCACTCTCGTTTAGATTGA
ACGGAGCTTGCTCCGTGATTGATAAACATTTGAGTGAGTGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACACG
TGGGTAACCTGCCCTAAAGTGGGGGATAACATTTGGAAACAGATNCTAATACCGCATAAA
ACCTAACACCGCATGGTGTAGGGTTGAAAGATGGTTTCGGCTATCACTTTAGGATGGACC
CGCGGTGCATTAGTTAGTTGGTGAGGTAAAGGCTCACCAAGACCGTGATGCATAGCCGAC
CTGAGAGGGTAATCGGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGACTCTACGGGAGGCAGC
AGTAGGGAATCTTCCACAATGGACGAAAGTCTGATGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGAGTGAAGAA
GGTTTTCGGATCGTAAAACTCTGTTGTTGGAGAAGAATGTATCTGATAGTAACTGATCAG
GTAGTGACGGTATCCAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTAATA
CGTAGGTGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGATTTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGAGCGCAGGCGGTTTCTTA
AGTCTGATGTGANANNCTTCGGCTCAACCGAAGAAGTGCATCGGAAACTGGGAAACTTGA
GTGCAGAAGAGGACAGTGGAACTCCATGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGATATATGGAAGA
ACACCAGTGGCGAAGGCGGCTGTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGCTCGAAAGCATGGG
TAGCAAACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCATGCCGTAAACGATGAGTGCTAGGTGTTG
GAGGGTTTCCGCCCTTCAGTGCCGCAGCTAACGCATTAAGCACTCCGCCTGGGGAGTACG
ACCGCAAGGTTGAAACTCAAAGGAATTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTGG
TTTAATTCGAAGCAACGCGAAGAACCTTACCAGGTCTTGACATCCTTTGACCACTCTAGA
GATAGAGCTTTCCCTTCGGGGACAAAGTGACAGGTGGTGCATGGTTGTCGTCAGCTCGTG
TCGTGAGATGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGAGCGCAACCCTTATTACTAGTTGCCAGCAT
TTAGTTGGGCACTCTAGTGAGACTGCCGGTGACAAACCGGAGGAAGGTGGGGACGACGTC
AAATCATCATGCCCCTTATGACCTGGGCTACACACGTGCTACAATGGATGGTACAACGAG
TTGCGAGACCGCGAGGTTTAGCTAATCTCTTAAAACCATTCTCAGTTCGGATTGTAGGCT
GCAACTCGCCTACATGAAGCCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGCGGATCAGCATGCCGCGGTGAA
TACGTTCCCGGGCCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACCATGAGAGTTTGTAACACCCAAAG
CCGGTGAGGTAACCCTTCGGGGNAGCCAGCCGTCTAAGGTGGGACAGATGATTAGGGTGA
AGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTAGGAGAACC

 

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