Welcome to INTJ Forum

This is a community where INTJs can meet others with similar personalities and discuss a wide variety of both serious and casual topics. If you aren't an INTJ, you're welcome to join anyway if you would like to learn more about this personality type or participate in our discussions. Registration is free and will allow you to post messages, see hidden subforums, customize your account and use other features only available to our members.

Seablue

French-grammar nazi

41 posts in this topic

I don't recall ever hearing a real French person say "sacre bleu". They do say "ooh la la" though. There are coup de everything in French. Thus a coup de fil is the telephone ringing. The prefix 'coup de' (cut of) is used to refer to a sudden event. Oh and the way the anglais pronounce 'le' is wrong, a Frenchman would hear that as "les". It is pronounced more like "luh", using English phonemes. Spoken French, more often than not, does not pronounce the final letter seen in written in French.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, envirodude said:

C'est vachement chouette cette tred. 

I had a series of french instructional tapes I would listen to in the car, and one of them used the term, vachement choette for like, tres cul, so I used it in class, and my french teacher whirled on me and said, "No.  Just.  No."  so of course I fell instantly in love with it.  Is it as ridiculous as its translation? 

Aaw ^^

Vachement chouette does translate as "very cool". (Avoid "très cul", as "cool" is an English word that the French word use as it is, and "cul" means "ass".) I imagine that when you mention a ridiculous translation, you mean the idea that "vachement chouette" could be translated as "cowly owl" or "cow like owl" as Swamp put it. While it's an amusing thing to think about, it's not actually a translation. "Chouette" can mean "owl" but it also means "neat, great", and just like with any homonym we don't actually think about one meaning when using the other one. (Etymologically, chouette as the animal as a different root than chouette as an adjective/interjection.) And "vachement" is a slang word for "very". It's derived from vache (cow) but that's not something people think about when they use the word. So the translation really just is "very neat" or "very cool" or whatever.

It's not very commonly used ("cool" is certainly more common now), but it is still used. I don't know what the teacher's beef with it was exactly... Maybe he found it too familiar for the context of the class, although it's certainly not vulgar.

 

5 hours ago, thod said:

I don't recall ever hearing a real French person say "sacre bleu". They do say "ooh la la" though. There are coup de everything in French. Thus a coup de fil is the telephone ringing. The prefix 'coup de' (cut of) is used to refer to a sudden event. Oh and the way the anglais pronounce 'le' is wrong, a Frenchman would hear that as "les". It is pronounced more like "luh", using English phonemes. Spoken French, more often than not, does not pronounce the final letter seen in written in French.

Sacrebleu is very old fashioned and indeed not something people would actually say, unless they make a conscious effort to use "dead" words. Sapristi or Saperlipopette are other funny interjections that nobody uses.

 
 
...... added to this post 1 minute later:
 
11 hours ago, Dancingqueen said:

I really enjoyed the french whore video you posted, and as a bonus, now I speak french! :awesome: 

 

Incidentally, Cirque du Soleil is referred to simply as 'Cirque' in Canada, as in: "Are you going to see the new Cirque?"

yeees :awesome:

 

I also grant my stamp of approval to this sentence, since it uses the before Cirque :p

 
 
...... added to this post 4 minutes later:
 
9 hours ago, WisePelican said:

Worked on a solar farm with a bunch of Québécois drillers. Heard Câlisse and osti quiiiite a bit.

Crazy fuckers.

I dunno how the Québecois would spell it, but I would say "osti" should be spelled "hostie". And yes, the "h" and the "e" are both silent letters.

Also, not that I want to disrespect Québec people, but I'd just like to clarify that they speak very, very different from French people in France, be it the vocabulary or the accent. The way they talk can leave a French person pissing themselves from laughter and/or incapable of understanding what's being said.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting.  Merci pour ton chouette reponse, putain. I didn't associate chouette with owl, but cabbage, because mon petit chou is a term of endearment.  Etymology anyone?  So I translated it as beastly little cabbage - and how could anyone not fall for a beastly little cabbage?

I think my teacher (a female, who you very frenchly referred to as a putain male - noted) was objecting to vachement because learners often look silly by trying to use slang or informal language, but doing so in an inappropriate context or using dated terms. 

BTW, is there any easy way to get french accents on an english keyboard?  Ctrl-' works in MS Office, but not online...  Nazis fucking love accents. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, envirodude said:

Nazis fucking love accents. 

That's why German keyboards have French accents. ;D 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Seablue said:

I dunno how the Québecois would spell it, but I would say "osti" should be spelled "hostie". And yes, the "h" and the "e" are both silent letters.

 

They are spelled incorrectly, and mispronounced, on purpose because they are used as swears in Québec. The whole Québecois swearing vocabulary is made up of butchered Catholic church terminology. Using "hostie" would be referring to the communion wafer in church, but "ostie" is a swear. 

 

Delicious delicious blasphemy! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, envirodude said:

Interesting.  Merci pour ton chouette reponse, putain. 

Ta, because réponse is feminine. Sorry ;)

1 hour ago, envirodude said:

 

I didn't associate chouette with owl, but cabbage, because mon petit chou is a term of endearment.  Etymology anyone?  So I translated it as beastly little cabbage - and how could anyone not fall for a beastly little cabbage?

Funny. Yeah, chou means cabbage but nothing to do with chouette.

1 hour ago, envirodude said:

I think my teacher (a female, who you very frenchly referred to as a putain male - noted) was objecting to vachement because learners often look silly by trying to use slang or informal language, but doing so in an inappropriate context or using dated terms. 

BTW, is there any easy way to get french accents on an english keyboard?  Ctrl-' works in MS Office, but not online...  Nazis fucking love accents. 

I don't think there's an easy way to get them, no :/ Maybe shortcuts but they're putain de complicated.

 
 
...... added to this post 0 minutes later:
 
1 hour ago, MissKat said:

HAHAHA cay la vie XD

NooOooOOooo

 
 
...... added to this post 0 minutes later:
 
4 minutes ago, Nemesis said:

They are spelled incorrectly, and mispronounced, on purpose because they are used as swears in Québec. The whole Québecois swearing vocabulary is made up of butchered Catholic church terminology. Using "hostie" would be referring to the communion wafer in church, but "ostie" is a swear. 

 

Delicious delicious blasphemy! 

Noted :p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Seablue said:

Also, not that I want to disrespect Québec people, but I'd just like to clarify that they speak very, very different from French people in France, be it the vocabulary or the accent. The way they talk can leave a French person pissing themselves from laughter and/or incapable of understanding what's being said.

It can be very very different. It's an extremely slangy dialect, and the pronunciations and connotations of common phrases can be extremely different. My ex spoke really nice European French, but when we'd go see local bands in Montreal I'd have to translate lyrics into English so she'd understand lol. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the modern connotation of coup de Jarnac in French?  This term seems to have taken on different meanings over the centuries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I learned 'Québécois' French in Canada, and a formalised form of 'France' French in the U.K., and sometimes found it necessary to change some of my pronunciations when I was studying in England. Not that often, but my French teacher in England (who was from France) could hear that I had an 'accent', by which she meant a Québécois accent (when speaking French, that is). That was about it, though. My Québécois friends speak more informally, more 'broad', than how we were taught in French classes, in much the same way as Anglophones speak with regional variations that differ in some ways from formal English. I always liked the equivalent of 'Yeah' that some of my friends tend to use: 'Ouais'....drawled-out French.

Edited by Madden
left out 'my'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Warrior said:

What is the modern connotation of coup de Jarnac in French?  This term seems to have taken on different meanings over the centuries.

A disloyal move, a sucker punch. It's not an expression you will see used often however.

 
 
...... added to this post 6 minutes later:
 

It's also a shame how the meaning evolved, it used to refer to a precise, powerful, skilled strike.

But because it was in the back, it gradually morphed into this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, slade19 said:

A disloyal move, a sucker punch. It's not an expression you will see used often however.

Interesting that it has come back around to that again.  That's different than the connotation I hear (and use).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Warrior said:

That's different than the connotation I hear (and use).

Which is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, slade19 said:

Which is?

Any type of strike to the back of the knee or calf (especially, but sometimes extended to the hamstring as well) that ends a fight or ar least causes the opponent to stumble or go down enough to allow you to disengage.  There no sense of underhandedness to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Warrior said:

What is the modern connotation of coup de Jarnac in French?  This term seems to have taken on different meanings over the centuries.

That's not something I've ever heard or read, or if I did I don't remember it.

So wiki says that the expression describes a masterful, violent and surprising blow, and that over the centuries it took on a connotation of being a disloyal blow, a connotation which didn't exist initially. (And then there's the literal sense that you mentioned, of a strike to the back of the knee.)  But you're unlikely to find a French person who ever uses that expression.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/10/2017 at 8:15 AM, Seablue said:

"Ménage à trois": Ménage = household. A ménage à trois, in French, refers to a polyamorous arrangement of some kind, where three people live together in a love/sexual triangle. Not a mere threesome. I just thought you might want to know this before you try to have a kinky one night stand with two French persons, and then wonder why instead of bringing condoms at your place, they are both bringing suitcases and starting to make arrangement to rent moving vans.

We Quebecers almost exclusively use it to refer to a threesome. ;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now