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ajrosales

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  • Content count

    399
  • Joined

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About ajrosales

  • Rank
    Member

Personality

  • MBTI
    ENTJ
  • Enneagram
    3w4
  • Global 5/SLOAN
    SCOEI
  • Astrology Sign
    Cancer

Converted

  • Homepage
    http://www.ajrosales.com
  • Biography
    see my website
  • Location
    Los Angeles, CA
  • Occupation
    architect / artist
  • Interests
    Architecture, Music, Food, Computers, Graphics, Science, Life
  • Gender
    Male

Recent Profile Visitors

322 profile views
  1. James Cameron is an ENTP
  2. maybe this? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karen_Horney
  3. I think this idea of a binary logic applied to painting "with" or "without" rules is somewhat unhelpful from an actual art-creation perspective. I'm not convinced art always has to be "classified" in some way. If an artist decides to (literally) create something instinctual or "random" to see "what happens" then there isn't going to be a conscious rule behind it. (hence the lack of purpose means that there is no initial "idea", just exploration).There are a lot of people that are not ok with such ambivalence. They need the idea to be packaged in some way for it to be meaningful. But that isn't how art is usually created. Perhaps you can post-rationalize a piece of art to discover what may have been happening instinctually in some way, but I'm not sure that means that the artist followed a rule that there are "no rules". I think the reason why people use this phrase is because they are trying to justify why it's ok to (attempt to) think in a free and flowing manner, unrestrained by preconception. To overanalyze this condition within art is a somewhat losing argument. In the end, art is visceral. You either instantly like it or you don't, whether or not you agree with the technique or theory, ruled or not.
  4. "We have twenty girls that write 'Johnson' all day long." "If you would dispose of that cigar I will thank you."
  5. How do you establish what is weird in a good way? Is the only criterion for good and weird that it makes an unusual series of sounds? Because that's pretty easy to do, more often than not. I'm just wondering what you think a "skilled" version of weird actually is. And why are you excluding the darker versions of weird? it seems like a limitation. When you use the words crazy and insane that represents madness, which isn't always expressed in positive terms. wait. huh... are you saying you're a member of the residents?
  6. great track names too.
  7. Mind Reader
  8. you should check out the rest of the Guided By Voices catalog though. Try listening to the rest of Bee Thousand if you can. It's not all like that. It's very idiosyncratic. ...... added to this post 12 minutes later: I know you said you don't care diddly for zappa, but at least check this out:
  9. do you like guided by voices? p.s. sorry but I could only subject myself to a sampling of each track you posted. some of that is just plain uninteresting. I've played "noise" or "art" rock in bands, but if stuff doesn't really "go anywhere" it's kind of pointless, to me anyway. anyone can put weird samples together and sing badly over the top. not all of it was like that but after a certain point it gets monotonous... and I'm all for experimentation.
  10. I just finished authoring an article that I have posted to my website.

    It's an essay that catalogs several weeks of research and diagramming that I contributed to the INFONAVIT Manos a la Obra competition, which works with architects to address the current housing development problems in Mexico.

    http://ajrosales.com/mexico-self-built-housing-in-queretaro

  11. If you read what I wrote you'd find that i'm not just describing his works but his approaches, which I find to be in the realm of "inventive practicality". look at his interest in anatomy, for example. it's highly indicative that he was a technician. that technical outlook arrays to almost every single thing he did. It's not a very "N" trait.
  12. I'm going to go out on a limb here. I'm going to say he was a very amazing ISTP. Why do I think this? Because his ideas are not really abstract. They are actually very concrete ideas. Very inventive but applied concretely. They are also amazingly detailed and intricate ideas, many of them fascinated with engineering or the "way things work", and I think he also took this approach to his paintings - ie: learning how to understand the way that light worked and how to represent that in different mediums, etc. His style of painting is quite literal and exacting to a certain degree. If he was an intuitive he wouldn't have spent so much time on such a methodical way of representing the world at large, imo.
  13. A lot of people don't know what good coffee tastes like. Properly made, coffee is like wine. Pre-ground coffee is really terrible, IMO. Batch-roasted coffee that is super fresh is amazingly tasty. Each blend can have different qualities, bitter, sweet, fruity, buttery (yes, buttery)... If you make coffee correctly (grind fresh each time, use quality water, not tap.. etc) you will find that the flavor of coffee is released more. Certain blends of coffee lend themselves to being drunk as-is. Those tend to be smoother, and richer. Other blends (specifically the more acidic ones) tend to benefit from a bit of milk and sugar. There's more balance on the palate that way. Even the quality of the milk and sugar is important to the outcome. I usually enjoy my coffee with a little milk, but I drink it black too. Yum.
  14. Smithsonian article says: "Although researchers have found these interesting associations between blood groups and disease, they still really don’t understand how and why such blood antigens evolved in the first place. " http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-mystery-of-human-blood-types-86993838/#DokAWPgG6mhLyg9l.99 I think it's interesting to say it "leads nowhere" because we know that's not entirely true. It just hasn't really been figured out yet. If they can prove causal relationships to diseases, wouldn't nutrition potentially play a role in shaping how healthy you are or how your body prevents disease? ps. I'm not saying it must be true - I'm just saying - it's foolish to say outright "it's bunk" - also according to this web article, our blood type (established by sugars) affects immune responses? http://www.livescience.com/33528-why-blood-types-exist-compatible.html anyway... carry on.