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remington

Members
  • Content count

    15
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About remington

  • Rank
    New Member

Personality

  • MBTI
    INTJ
  • Brain Dominance
    4

Converted

  • Location
    Toronto
  • Occupation
    Computer Programmer
  • Interests
    Investing, Reading, Languages
  • Gender
    Male
  1. I'm not sure of the situation for accountants in Australia, but a lot in the US stay with the firms long enough to become Chartered Accountants (usually 1-2 years) and then go to work for businesses that they did accounting for or for other companies. I'm pretty sure you'll be closer to a management position after gaining 1-2 years experience in an accounting firm than 3-4 years of studying Geology. You also have other options such as management consulting which draws on graduates from many different subjects including accounting. Management consultants get to travel a lot, work on challenging problems, and develop their strategic skills. Plus after 1-2 years of consulting you'll be able be able to get a job with another company that would take years to get if you worked your way up inside the company. Another thing, you're going to find politics in any organization you work in. So accept this fact and remember that the faster you get to the top, the less you have to deal with it.
  2. I drink, but never get drunk. When I drink too much I talk won't shut up -- I just keep talking and talking. It makes me look like a fool, so I don't do it.
  3. I generally rely on probabilities when forming views on a subject or when discussing my views, so I rarely claim certainty. Over time you'll see many so-called experts who are "certain" that they are right and are then irrefutably proven wrong. It makes you realize that the best you can hope for is a high probability of being right -- even if you're an expert in your field. When evaluating other people and their ideas I always look for "intellectual humility". The most intelligent people are the first to admit that their ideas may not be 100% correct.
  4. ...or as bad as dressing twins in the same clothes for the opposite gender.
  5. Interact with your circle of friends as much as possible and talk with girls in this group without the intention of asking them on a date. This will help you act more naturally and come across as more confident. While talking with girls, learn about their interests and gauge their interest in you. Interact more frequently with the girls where there is mutual interest. Going on a date after this will come naturally.
  6. Firefox is my default. Although I use Chrome on occasion.
  7. Positive attitude. Independent thinking. Goal-oriented. Attractive.
  8. I wouldn't say I'm a pro at losing friends, but I rarely keep in touch with friends that I don't come into contact with on a regular basis. But even when I run into an old friend that I haven't seen for years, we're always able to pick up as if we've been close friends all along.
  9. This. And most clichés.
  10. Based on her response I think you can be pretty sure she is not interested in you as more than a friend right now. If she was interested she would not invite her friends even if she thought you just wanted to hang out casually. However, this doesn't mean this can't develop into more.
  11. Ambition.
  12. <p>Nice avatar</p>

  13. Chapter 20 of the Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham -- it discusses "Margin of Safety" and the idea that "Investment is most intelligent when it is most businesslike."
  14. 51 bpm. It used to be in the thirties when I was a competitive distance runner.
  15. I recommend first reading Appendix G of "Topgrading" by Bradford D. Smart. This will help you determine which management competencies you need to improve and should help you narrow down your book search. You can use Amazon.com's “Look Inside” feature to view the appendix for free. Once you know which specific skills you need to improve I can probably recommend some good books.