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Intelligence and Mental Disorders None
Old 12-12-2011, 03:44 PM   #1
Hawkx
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Why is it that people who are intelligent are more likely to suffer from mental disorders? Have you also noticed this trend?



Have any of you ever gotten that numb feeling, it's as if you have electricity coursing though every part of your body. I had that experience today and I think I had a mental breakdown along with it. Also seems like I have OCD plus OCPD which could be tied in with my depression. Oh also the out of body experience....
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Old 12-12-2011, 04:05 PM   #2
Plato
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  Originally Posted by Hawkx
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Have any of you ever gotten that numb feeling, it's as if you have electricity coursing though every part of your body. I had that experience today and I think I had a mental breakdown...

Yes. Particularly, when my stress level is through the roof.

 
Why is it that people who are intelligent are more likely to suffer from mental disorders.

Generalizing and simplifying, the less intelligent are less complex. They take the world for what it is rather than trying to dissect and understand it. They prefer things at face value and do not bother digging beneath the surface. The people that fall into depression will typically analyze their inner self and outer world and be highly critical - less accepting of who they are as a result. This can lead to having a false analysis of self and depression can end up being self-fulfilling. Majority of people that are happy also tend to have a false analysis of self - but on the other side of the spectrum. Their confidence is typically irrational and illogical, but it keeps them upbeat and positive.

In other words, from what I have seen, it can be more difficult for intellectuals to face everyday problems because they have a preference to understand things rather than accept things for how they are. This can lead to blowing up small problems and every problem becomes a major hurdle. When faced with this, it can be overwhelming and relatively easy to spiral into depression. It can also open up doors to try and escape these problems mentally in unhealthy ways.

I don't have a link to a study, but I think it is generally known that healthier people tend to have a warped perception of reality that leans toward their personal preferences and as a result, they have an exaggerated confidence.

Just my two cents from observations.

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Old 12-12-2011, 04:33 PM   #3
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Powerful brains are like powerful sports cars. You can go really fast in the wrong direction and it's a lot harder to tame a powerful car/brain.

Pilot induced oscillation.
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Old 12-12-2011, 04:48 PM   #4
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It's interesting, in that the studies I've come across suggest that high self-confidence is tied to physical health. If one takes Depressive realism into account, and those that possess it supposedly have a relatively accurate perception of reality, this could possibly reduce their self-confidence which may decrease overall health. Lowering of physical health could increase the risk of acquiring a mental disorder. One study claimed that prolonged heightened levels of cortisol is a potentially large contributing factor for psychotic depression.
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Old 12-13-2011, 10:40 AM   #5
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  Originally Posted by TheStranger
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It's interesting, in that the studies I've come across suggest that high self-confidence is tied to physical health. If one takes Depressive realism into account, and those that possess it supposedly have a relatively accurate perception of reality, this could possibly reduce their self-confidence which may decrease overall health. Lowering of physical health could increase the risk of acquiring a mental disorder. One study claimed that prolonged heightened levels of cortisol is a potentially large contributing factor for psychotic depression.

I know that when I do things for my health - eat right, go for walks, exercise - or even do things that are strictly for appearance like dress nice - I feel a lot better about myself. Taking affirmative steps to make yourself more attractive touches on some very deep subconscious needs.

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Old 12-14-2011, 02:33 AM   #6
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There is definitely a connection between intelligence and disorders.

Take two of my "heroes", for example. Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie.

Stephen Fry is pretty much the champion of humanity. He fights for human rights, atheism, he's a brilliant comedian and actor... And he's bipolar.

Hugh Laurie is the most talented man I know. He's possibly one of the best actors around, he plays the piano, guitar, drums and harmonica, he's incredibly funny. He's suffering from clinical depression.

Now, let's look at me. I am still quite young, but I consider myself far above my peers in intelligence levels. After having a "breakdown", I was sent to a psychiatrist where I, after discussing my problem (incredible boredom and apathy), was tested for bipolar disorder. They thought that I was too young for it to be conclusive, however.

I do however have a mild version of narcissistic personality disorder and I wear it as a badge of honour.
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Old 12-15-2011, 10:54 AM   #7
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I'm a Mensa and Triple Nine member, and I have had depression my whole life. I don't think it's unusual at all - most of the people I know who are in the same class are all depression sufferers. I've had to hide it because of my military service, which made it really bad when I was forced to go untreated to keep the condition concealed.

I think it's a characteristic of high intelligence, unfortunately.
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Old 12-15-2011, 07:32 PM   #8
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Sometimes people are so magnificently intelligent that it's almost overwhelming for them and it may seem as though they have a disorder when really it's just they are geniuses. I don't believe they have a disorder they are just extremely gifted.
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Old 12-15-2011, 07:44 PM   #9
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the more intelligent you are the more you are able to realize everything in the world thats wrong and you cant do anything about...which can lead to depression, stress, anxiety, and all that fun stuff. you know what they say...ignorance is bliss.
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Old 12-15-2011, 08:14 PM   #10
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I'm stupid enough to not be a genius, but still alienated and "worth" less. I don't think it's clear cut.
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Old 12-15-2011, 08:47 PM   #11
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I'm not aware of any legitimate studies correlating high I.Q. with mental illness but I have not researched the subject. In my experience as a mental health counselor I would suspect schizophrenia and other mental health problems are more correlated with low IQ, if there is any correlation at all. Certainly anyone, regardless of their intelligence, can experience mental health problems.
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Old 12-15-2011, 10:29 PM   #12
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I think the connection is pretty established, maybe not in academic circles but just through casual observation. I think we can all name several high-profile geniuses who had serious mental issues of one type or another--Howard Hughes is the one that springs to mind first, for me personally.

I have OCD, myself. And what "Plato" said earlier makes sense. I find I think a lot more about things than most other people do--why you don't want the bags your groceries come in on the counter that you prepare you food on, for instance. It's enough to send me for the paper towels and bleach, but most people I know could care less.

Or perhaps it really is some sort of biochemical thing going on. Either way, I can tell you from experience that there are a lot of brilliant mentally ill folks, but a lot of stupid ones, too.
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Old 12-16-2011, 01:01 AM   #13
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I think people with more education are more likely to seek treatment, and are, therefore, more likely to be diagnosed.
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Old 12-16-2011, 11:26 AM   #14
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Being intelligent and smart is something still under discussion on what it is, how it works and where it takes you.

  Originally Posted by Monte314
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I think people with more education are more likely to seek treatment, and are, therefore, more likely to be diagnosed.

I've seen far too many "intelligent" people around here using the forum like yahoo answers... so wrong.

It's been discussed how intjs might get lost when they face too much stress. I agree with the comparison of powerful cars, the more complex the mind, the more complex the way out, a lot of people believe they can heal themselves, if they solved a lot of problems, sometimes approach at their own the same way.

Take per example medicine. It is common that doctors don't treat their own familiy on critical situations, the same with us, no matter how intelligent we are, we should look for help, treatment, and not trying to solve everything ourselves.



Intelligence and mental disorders? I guess when people are right the most majority of times, they might be wrong and still think they are right, fine, healthy.

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Old 12-16-2011, 11:51 AM   #15
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Schizophrenia is associated with low pre-morbid IQ. I don't know about the other disorders.
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Old 12-16-2011, 11:58 AM   #16
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  Originally Posted by Hawkx
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Why is it that people who are intelligent are more likely to suffer from mental disorders? Have you also noticed this trend?

The abnormal is defined by the normal.

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Old 12-16-2011, 02:15 PM   #17
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I don't believe one would find a statistically significant correlation between high-IQ and any of the disorders mentioned other than depression.
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Old 12-16-2011, 02:36 PM   #18
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While I don't believe there is a direct correlation between personality profile and objectively measured intelligence, I do feel the intensity of INTJs' analytic scrutiny of things they experience and encounter magnifies the objective symptoms of any given depression or other psychiatric malady they may have.

I also feel that having a higher IQ, while not directly correlated to psychiatric issues can exacerbate the observable symptoms of said issues.

When you throw in the relatively exclusive status of an INTJ as a percentage of the overall population, it can be easy to reasonably correlate intelligence to depression or other maladies. Thus it is easy to over-generalize psychiatric issues as indicative of intelligence.
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Old 12-16-2011, 03:00 PM   #19
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  Originally Posted by ScholarSoldier
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I'm a Mensa and Triple Nine member, and I have had depression my whole life. I don't think it's unusual at all - most of the people I know who are in the same class are all depression sufferers. I've had to hide it because of my military service, which made it really bad when I was forced to go untreated to keep the condition concealed.

I think it's a characteristic of high intelligence, unfortunately.

I'm in the same boat, regarding the military service. I think I may have OCD, but not the kind where you feel you have to clean all the time . . . it's more oriented towards checking things, moreover counting, breathing, and movement rituals (these aren't perceived by other people, however).

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