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INTJ: More likely to get depression? depression, psychological disorders
Old 04-10-2008, 11:43 PM   #1
sriv
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Refer to title.

I have been seeing a lot of messed up stories about INTJ childhood. Is this a common trend, or are the complainers the only posters? It does not make much sense that INTJs would be depressed because they usually repress their feelings. Emotional breakdowns lead to loss of efficiency which they cannot afford. Still so many pitiable stories. Why? Is it because they tend to be nihilistic? Tend to be socially unfulfilled?
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:55 PM   #2
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It's probably because we repressed our feelings and don't get in touch with them. They eventually get back to us and we can no longer repressed them. Sometimes we just need someone to talk to and sort out our feelings...
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Old 04-11-2008, 12:07 AM   #3
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Some depression is to be expected, but depression is a huge problem for INFJ's over INTJ's. INFJ's often get misidentified as INTJ's (the NJ lets them fool themselves and others about the T aspect), but we do have a lot in common with them in any event. For me it tends to be linked to SSAD. It's always been transient for me, though, so I don't have a lot of advice for the clinically depressed.
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Old 04-11-2008, 07:37 AM   #4
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I read that perfectionists are less likely to fall into depression, but more likely to have difficulty getting out. I wonder if this would hold true for INTJs too. I know I have a lot of tendencies that tend to perpetuate my depressions once I get into them.

And it's entirely possible that INTJs aren't more likely to be depressed, but that ones who are are more likely to spend a lot of time on the internet!
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Old 04-11-2008, 07:47 AM   #5
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Can't depression have a symptom in lacking emotion? That is, diminished ability to feel happiness and pleasure? That would seem INTJ-like to me~
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Old 04-11-2008, 08:10 AM   #6
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My guess would be that INTJs aren't more likely to get depressed, but are more likely to fall into depression over the things you described. A lot of things cause depression, the 'surrounded by idiots' thing would lead to it in a specific way, no doubt.
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Old 04-11-2008, 10:44 AM   #7
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My assumption is that INTJs are smart enough to realize that life is, in fact, quite depressing.
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Old 04-11-2008, 11:06 AM   #8
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Well, I've heard it said that INFPs are the type most likely to self harm and have suicidal thoughts.

According to
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they are the type "most likely to report suicidal thoughts in college."
I don't know how true that is, but I can vouch for the self harm thing myself, and looking at many of the other INFPs on the some other forum, so can they.

I'm not actually quite sure how that links to depression, but I would be inclined to think that INxxs are more likely to get depressed, for a variety of reasons.
Because the reasons you posted why INTJs are likely to get depressed can apply to pretty much any INxx type, and especially types with Fi.
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Old 04-11-2008, 11:18 AM   #9
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Unfortunately, I really think INFPs have the worst problem with depression. We internalize everything, and while INTJs have Ni working at full-speed, we have Fi boiling within as one of our strongest functions. Added to this mix is the fact that, even though we feel things deeply, we are like you in that we cannot always express those feelings coherently and comfortably.

We can be perfectionists, and are just as hard on ourselves as you are, but we cannot separate the idea and practice of perfection from the identity and expression of our true selves. Therefore, the perfectionism eats away at us.

Unless we have developed our "depression alert!" radar and a strong personal support system of friends and family, we can sink into deep funks, retreating further and further into ourselves until external activities and interactions are impossible.

Teenage angst does nothing to help this during adolescence.

But it is not a hopeless cause. I think that while all personality types may eventually struggle in this area at one point or another during their lives, we are equally capable of learning to read the signals our body sends us and to take responsibility for our reactions.
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Old 04-11-2008, 12:19 PM   #10
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Throughout and before high school I avoided friends, people in general, and social activities. This included not getting a job. When I started college, I moved out. I was forced to get a job for bills and many of my first classes involved group activities. I had a hard time applying for jobs and joining the group activities, even though I knew I was qualified for both. Soon I got a disappointing job (fast food) and my grades started slipping. After saving up some money I quit the job hoping that would give me more time for school, but I still had a hard time concentrating. I ended up being easily distracted, skipping classes, and sleeping whole days away. When I started running low on cash, I tried to apply for another job but the stress led to panic attacks. I'd get a call for a job interview, but when I got to the parking lot I'd start freaking out. It got hard to breathe, I'd get a head rush & sort of black out (see stars), and I felt paralyzed. I'd tell myself to stop being a b**** and get up, but I couldn't. After an hour of sitting there, I'd leave. I felt like I failed myself.
I ended up seeing the university therapist. I ended up going to her twice a week and seeing the psychiatrist for meds. She diagnosed me with depression and said she thought it was because my declared major (mass comm, advertising) didn't seem to fit me. So she had me do the myers-briggs. I came out an INTJ and read up on it. Seemed to fit me perfectly. Maybe she was right, but that didn't matter. I had to have my parents bail me out with my rent and after the semester I moved back home.
I continued with the therapy and medication. I was rediagnosed with severe depression. This time I was referred to a self help group. Everyone there seemed to be ten times crazier than me. This sort of put things into perspective. The therapist said I needed to get another job and this would help to make friends & build my self esteem and confidence. He also suggested joining a coed social group, like a frisbee or volley ball team to meet some girls. I got the job, but I'm not gonna join any social activity unless someone drags me into it. I eventually stopped going to my therapy sessions because they got repetitive and stopped taking the medication because they didn't seem to be doing anything.

That's a little more than I intended to share, but the point is that I'm an INTJ (I've taken the actual test 3 times and several online tests numerous times over the past few years, all with the same conclusion) and from two different professionals I was diagnosed with depression. I also feel I was and still am "depressed". Explaining why might be a little more difficult. I think it's because a variety of reasons. Basically I feel I'm lacking in many areas of my life and even though I think up ways of fixing them to better myself, I can't seem to follow through.
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Old 04-11-2008, 01:35 PM   #11
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I often go to this state, but I'm happy I made real friends who give advise when I start to go down that road..
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the key is tell your problems to other people.. who you trust so much you don't care what they think
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I usually get positive response.
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Old 04-11-2008, 01:42 PM   #12
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Think about it this way, up until pretty recently being introverted was seen as a negative thing in psychology. Then add to the fact that you rarely tend to run into people like yourself, and years of people saying you are so distant and cold. I don't care who you are after a while it starts to wear on you, especially if you've made attempts to correct it and find frustration and strife along the way

I know with me personally, I had convinced myself that there was something absolutely wrong with me. I never had a large amount of friends, I tended to be like Howard Dean when it came to emotions (not enough, or way over the top) and due to past experiences I had a very big issue with trust, and all of it eventually turned into anxiety, and at sometimes depression. I still have a bunch of work to do, and its a major effort to keep the anxiety from building up sometimes. If at all, all I can say is that I'm aware of whats going on, now the job is to fix it.
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Old 04-11-2008, 03:23 PM   #13
The Many
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I have had several long bouts of depression, most of them stemming from some kind of inferiority complex and not exactly a fear of failure, but rather self-loathing from failing. I was about 15 the first time, I was depressed and suicidal since I had no friends and I essentially felt like a complete failure - parents etcetera continually telling me to be more out-going (as they always have done) certainly did not help me with this. Plus I was over-weight and stuff like that.

Then the second time was a couple of years later, I had been involved with a girl who was the first person I have loved for real. She dumped me after a while, claiming that she never was serious about it - this made me feel inferior again, especially when coupled with the social failures I have always had earlier as well. This time the depression was a lot more serious. I was suicidal for months, but somehow managed to get myself out of there as I met a new girl who actually appreciated me... of course, we split up quite early as well, but that is beside the point.

I have never seen a therapist, though, having managed to get myself together all these times, which I am proud of as there have been other instances than the two I mentioned above as well. Right now I am starting to fall into depression again for a number of reasons, I have even started to contemplate suicide again.

As to the actual questions, though, I think a lot of INTJness in general; constantly needing to live up to very high standards, distrust of others, etcetera, is about an inferiority (and/or superiorirt) complex which stems from (mainly) a biological inability to be socially fulfilled. It is not so much a question of nihilism, in fact, at least I personally usually have a pretty positive outlook at life and the future, but rather of judging oneself too harshly and being unable to recieve emotional support from more or less anyone who is not a trained psychologist, as people simply do not understand the INTJ psyche. In fact, not even most INTJs understand themselves very well either, which adds to the confusion.
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Old 04-11-2008, 05:21 PM   #14
True Rune
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I had this last year for similar reasons, failure, constant failure. And nihilistic thoughts, I got out of it on my own, but interesting points, I can relate quite well. I read something somewhere that an asexual person is more susceptible to depression, and asexuality seems a little more common in our type, so there may be a correlation? (I have no idea, to be honest..)
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Old 04-11-2008, 06:31 PM   #15
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1) We don't recognize our feelings until they're pretty severe. Some people may deny this, but I don't think we understand our feelings. So we usually just get occupied with something else instead of fixing the wrong.
2) We don't show our feelings even IF they're pretty severe. This is caused by our independence, and our need to keep being independent.

I think sometimes this is caused by the environment in which people grew up in. In other words, some INTJs are INTJ because of a bad childhood and they were forced to be independent and quiet about their feelings. Others are INTJ, and have these problems because they're INTJ.
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Old 04-11-2008, 07:51 PM   #16
sriv
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I am asking this because I have never experienced it before myself.

Do you guys think that I's suffer greater depression than E's?

Maybe because you all are telling depressed people to talk about their problems and technically it would be harder for an I to talk about his/her problems than it would for an E.

 
This is caused by our independence, and our need to keep being independent.

So you think it would be better to psychologically share the pain?

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Old 04-11-2008, 07:54 PM   #17
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  Originally Posted by sriv
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I am asking this because I have never experienced it before myself.

Do you guys think that I's suffer greater depression than E's?

Maybe because you all are telling depressed people to talk about their problems and technically it would be harder for an I to talk about his/her problems than it would for an E.



So you think it would be better to psychologically share the pain?

I think it's also the T/F factor too. Most Ts view being emotional as a weak point or disadvantage so we're less likely to ALLOW it show.

I think technically it's better to vent it.
I'd still have to be pushed to a REALLY bad spot before do it though.

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Old 04-11-2008, 08:34 PM   #18
The Many
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  Originally Posted by sriv
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I am asking this because I have never experienced it before myself.

Do you guys think that I's suffer greater depression than E's?

Maybe because you all are telling depressed people to talk about their problems and technically it would be harder for an I to talk about his/her problems than it would for an E.

I have seen some statistics stating this correlation, so, yes, Is have an easier time getting depressed than Es. Unfortunately I don't have a link around at the moment, though. This reason you are stating seems to be one explanation, another part of the problem could also be that Is have a tendency to introspect a lot more than Es, and hence will also focus on problems which Es will neglect. Also, Is do not have as many social connections and will thus have a harder time finding many people with whom to talk about these issues.

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Old 04-11-2008, 08:40 PM   #19
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I have dysthymic depression. A VAST part of this depression is the feeling of "emotionlessness"--where I will go days without being able to identify any significant emotion whatsoever. But it's not a neutral state at all--it is distinctly negative. It is a "dead" feeling
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Old 04-11-2008, 09:30 PM   #20
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  Originally Posted by malefide
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I have dysthymic depression. A VAST part of this depression is the feeling of "emotionlessness"--where I will go days without being able to identify any significant emotion whatsoever. But it's not a neutral state at all--it is distinctly negative. It is a "dead" feeling

I've been through something similar... at one point I realized I was just so distressed I was suppressing everything and it ended up making it worse. So I just spent a day not caring that the sky was falling down and just did random things, took a nice walk and got my goals straight again.

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Old 04-11-2008, 11:35 PM   #21
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I believe we only get depressed when our goals and ideals are under threat. When the very things we live to achieve no longer appear achievable.
We then must question our inner selves whether we can continue and whether it is worth it. This "period of self-evaluation" carries uncertainty and self-doubt which weakens ourselves for the moment of reflection.

Afterwards if we choose to continue we have a new plan and a renewed vigour. Meanwhile if we still question ourselves, we question our purposes, our meaning and hence our existence.

Its as if we know what we live for, we know what we want and we see how to get there. If not then we go into a period where we must find ourselves again or when we can't tolerate the inefficiency of our current paths we must adjust our effort or adjust our goals.
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Old 04-12-2008, 01:52 AM   #22
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  Originally Posted by malefide
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I have dysthymic depression. A VAST part of this depression is the feeling of "emotionlessness"--where I will go days without being able to identify any significant emotion whatsoever. But it's not a neutral state at all--it is distinctly negative. It is a "dead" feeling

I don't know whether I have dysthymic depression, but sometimes I just feel emotionless, dead, almost like a zombie. I use to feel my emotions more strongly, now I feel "tiredness" as my main emotion, as if I am tired of having emotions. People have said I speak monotonously, but then again, I have met other people who have boring voices (and a few professors who bore the &^*% out of me in class...).

I guess this is because I feel like my life is not headed towards any direction; my future is nebulous and I am afraid of uncertainty... I'm still going through this "period of self-evaluation" right now.

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Old 04-12-2008, 11:12 AM   #23
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Usually, I change my goals and efforts unconciously faced with adversity. I make decisions very quickly and if I cannot, then I just take it in stride. This period of self-evaluation seems like a journey to find hope, but I cannot imagine giving up hope. It is something I would never do.
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Old 04-12-2008, 01:01 PM   #24
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  Originally Posted by sriv
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Usually, I change my goals and efforts unconciously faced with adversity. I make decisions very quickly and if I cannot, then I just take it in stride. This period of self-evaluation seems like a journey to find hope, but I cannot imagine giving up hope. It is something I would never do.

For me, self-evaluation isn't really about finding hope. It's more like looking into yourself and learning more about who you are, like for example, what makes you happy, what do you really want to get out of life...etc. Sometimes we realize that our goals and actions will not get us where we want so we need to adjust them.

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Old 04-12-2008, 01:07 PM   #25
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i actually like depression, to an acceptable extent

my greatest writing have come about when i was in my lowest times

i'll actually put some here from my journals once i get off work and can get home

my journals took quiet a bit of time typing from paper to disk

but most impressive since they go as far back as 2001
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