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INTJ's & INTP's Link to a personality disorder None
Old 01-08-2008, 07:13 PM   #1
Nate08
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The full link is here. This is worth reading. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizoid_personality_disorder#Akhtar_phenomenologi cal_profile"

Schizoid personality disorder (SPD) is a personality disorder characterized by a lack of interest in social relationships, a tendency towards a solitary lifestyle, secretiveness, and emotional coldness.[1] SPD is reasonably rare compared with other personality disorders. Its prevalence is estimated at less than 1% of the general population.[2]


SPD is believed by some to correlate with the INTJ and INTP personality types in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). SPD is far more common among males than among females, although this could be due in part to the fact that schizoid symptoms are far less socially acceptable in women.

SPD shares several aspects with depression, avoidant personality disorder and Asperger's Syndrome, and can be difficult to distinguish from these other disorders. However, there are some important differentiating features:
While people who have SPD can also suffer from clinical depression, this is certainly not always the case. Unlike depressed people, persons with SPD generally do not consider themselves inferior to others, although they will probably recognise that they are different.
Unlike avoidant personality disorder, those affected with SPD do not avoid social interactions due to anxiety or feelings of incompetence, but because they are genuinely indifferent to social relationships; however, in a 1989 study,[56] "schizoid and avoidant personalities were found to display equivalent levels of anxiety, depression, and psychotic tendencies as compared to psychiatric control patients."
Unlike Asperger's Syndrome, SPD does not involve an impairment in nonverbal communication (e.g., lack of eye-contact or unusual prosody) or a pattern of restricted interests or repetitive behaviors (e.g., a strict adherence to routines or rituals, or an unusually intense interest in a single topic). Instead people with SPD are typically more indifferent with regard to their activities. However, in a sample of schizoid children, Sula Wolff noticed that "Having special interest patterns differentiated highly between schizoid and control boys." SPD does not affect the ability to express oneself or communicate effectively with others, and is not believed to be related to any form of autism.





Nate08 added to this post, 3 minutes and 44 seconds later...

Does this mean we can class ESFP's with the whore / Player disorder ???
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Old 01-08-2008, 07:18 PM   #2
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Makes sense, I would assume introverted smart people (NT's) would be more likely to be socially blase. Not really too shocking.

It's sort of like saying giants are more likely to weigh more than average-height adults, even if their BMI is the same.
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Old 01-09-2008, 10:16 AM   #3
Antares
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  Originally Posted by Nate08
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Does this mean we can class ESFP's with the whore / Player disorder ???

Histrionic Personality Disorder

Would this fit the bill?

 
You need attention! You behave inappropriately provocative and seductive towards others in order to draw attention to yourself. Your theatrical language makes everything sound a bazillion times more exciting than it really is!

From facebook :D

 
[edit] Mnemonic
A mnemonic that can be used to remember the criteria for histrionic personality disorder is PRAISE ME[8][9]:

P - provocative (or seductive) behavior
R - relationships, considered more intimate than they are
A - attention, must be at center of
I - influenced easily
S - speech (style) - wants to impress, lacks detail
E - emotional lability, shallowness
M - make-up - physical appearance used to draw attention to self
E - exaggerated emotions - theatrical

I don't know whether we can draw a link between ESFP and this disorder, but it's the closest I can find.


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Old 01-09-2008, 05:58 PM   #4
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They mention a drug they use for schizoids. That would be fun, take this drug and become a touchy-feely extrovert. Could spend hours discussing the inter-personal relationships around me, which I normaly oblivious to.

I would like to see things from the other side more if only to get a handle on how their minds work. All part of self improvement.
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Old 01-09-2008, 07:37 PM   #5
1OFMANY
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  Originally Posted by thod
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They mention a drug they use for schizoids. That would be fun, take this drug and become a touchy-feely extrovert. Could spend hours discussing the inter-personal relationships around me, which I normaly oblivious to.

I would like to see things from the other side more if only to get a handle on how their minds work. All part of self improvement.


DONT DO IT MAN!!! For the love of all thats holy, stay focused and out of THEIR HEADS!!

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Old 01-09-2008, 08:39 PM   #6
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  Originally Posted by 1OFMANY
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DONT DO IT MAN!!! For the love of all thats holy, stay focused and out of THEIR HEADS!!


Kind of makes you think, 1% of the population are INTJ along with 1% of the population have this Mental disorder. The links are there.

On another note you would ask why is it that only 1% of the population is INTJ ?

Does the "ALL MIGHTY/ GOD/ ADONAI" Have a Plan for us?

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Old 01-09-2008, 10:57 PM   #7
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Camelopardalis - ISFP's also have that disorder.

Nate - SSRI's, St. John's Wort, or 5-HTP can get you to the "other side." It's an interesting ride.
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Old 01-10-2008, 05:51 PM   #8
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I feel that I have experienced SPD. in the past it was so extreme that I went into a depression. For the simple reason that I didn't know what was wrong with me! I started taking an antidepressant. Though no longer unhappy with my avoidant personality type... the traits of SPD are still very much there. Is it unhealthy I wonder? If not why would it be considered a disorder?
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Old 01-11-2008, 07:41 AM   #9
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I'm sorry, but this looks like a way of describing a "fringe" personality (and the INTJ type is fringe, as it represents between 1-3% of the population depending on who's counting) as a disorder. The concept being, "If you are not like us, then there is something wrong with you that needs to be fixed". Many aspects of the (so-called) SPD are quite similar to aspects of the INTJ and INTP personality descriptions. It just irks me that it is called a "disorder", and one that requires treatment!

screw SPD
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Old 01-16-2008, 06:43 PM   #10
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I think schizoid is more like when the INTJ/P goes all wrong in all the wrong directions...not the type per se.

If it is../me hides under the bed with a stick...they are not going to get me
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Old 01-18-2008, 08:14 AM   #11
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rwyatt365
I agree entirely. So, some people like to be left alone and don't want to "let other people in"
Is that a disorder or just a preference?
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Old 01-18-2008, 10:13 AM   #12
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  Originally Posted by pletharoe
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I agree entirely. So, some people like to be left alone and don't want to "let other people in"
Is that a disorder or just a preference?

I think it's usually considered a "disorder" more than a "preference" when it becomes personally disruptive and internally unpleasant for the person (compulsively) behaving in this way. Basically, when the behaviour is dysfunctional. Although it should be added that effectively dysfunctional behaviour can also be a consequence of happening to chafe cultural expectation -- something which tends to be arbitrarily arranged, and especially when we're talking about rituals and rites of passage. For example, I'm sure that many of the strongly introverted amongst us have heard at some point or another people characterize our healthy inclinations as being undesirable or strange or depressing (and therefore some sort of fault or failing). However, it is my opinion that one is only expressing cynicism by superimposing this unpleasant and absurd experience over psychological science in general. And so, while I myself would agree with the general sentiment wary of this sort of diagnostic, I don't think it necessarily a medicalization of something misunderstood.

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Old 01-18-2008, 12:39 PM   #13
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Stasis,
Hmmmm, very interesting. I suppose that any personality trait, if taken to the extreme, could hence be classified as a disorder?
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Old 01-18-2008, 02:06 PM   #14
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  Originally Posted by pletharoe
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I suppose that any personality trait, if taken to the extreme, could hence be classified as a disorder?

Pretty much. At the same time though, I would be hesitant to use extremity as a criterion, because a trait can be "extreme" in terms of its statistical relationship to the average trait or the social norm and yet highly functional (or even superiorly so) nonetheless. I would agree with the idea that any exaggerated trait can be a manifestation of a disorder. What we're looking for, in my opinion, when calling a behavior "disordered" is it being actually damaging to the health of the sufferer and/or those who surround the sufferer in causing some sort of strong psychological, emotional, or physical distress, and also the behavior being persistent despite conscious attempts to temper or end it.

That a wide range of personality disorders are not infrequently found to be
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with a depressive disorder is one thing making them easier to distinguish from mere eccentricities, for example.

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Old 01-21-2008, 10:43 AM   #15
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Very well said stasis.
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Old 01-21-2008, 11:35 AM   #16
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as a side note - i've noticed that almost all of the people in my life are solidly histrionic, narcissistic, and/or borderline. borderline personality disorder shares a lot of similarities with INTJs i've noticed (moreso than purely schizoid), and i have a lot of FP types in my life who are completely self-absorbed.

when i was seeing a therapist it was pretty interesting to see how many "disorder" type issues i have in my life, yet how very little of it could truly be classified as a "disorder" due to the fact that it isn't actively negatively impacting me. it's only a disorder if it negatively impacts your life. i've spent my life dancing around these issues and learning how to overcome them, while i can plainly see the results of failure to do so in the other people in my life... and there is a really big difference there.
i think we INTJ's do better for the most part because we are very self-centered and introspectively and willing to actively apply change to our lives and take outside advice if we feel that it is valuable.
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Old 01-22-2008, 04:47 AM   #17
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Hi all,

I too resent being characterized as somebody with a problem. I am able to fake the small talk when needed and I can successfully attend parties and converse if it is strategically worthwhile. I do not have anxiety in these settings, nor am I shy. In fact, people are often shocked when I tell them I'm an introvert. I've gotten pretty good at pretending to enjoy conversations around the water cooler. The issue is that, deep down, I am INCREDIBLY bored and a bit resentful that I have to fake it so much. I get so bored at social events that I can't wait to get back home to enjoy reading one of my more interesting technical books (for example). Why is this considered such a bad thing. I think it is incredibly awesome that we can entertain ourselves so well.

Life would be so much more fun if I could find people with which to share intensely deep conversations. I rarely find people who want to talk about any subject a fraction of the time I do. I find I am just getting warmed up as they are ready to change the subject. Ho hum... Glad to find this forum!
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Old 01-22-2008, 05:37 AM   #18
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  Originally Posted by hfortenberry
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Life would be so much more fun if I could find people with which to share intensely deep conversations.

That's why god invented the internet.

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Old 01-22-2008, 07:05 AM   #19
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I read that schizotypal tends to be INTJ and that schizoid tends to be INTP. It was from the Oldham website. I think the Oldham site usually types INTJ as 5w4 and INTP as 5w6. When you think about each disorder, it makes perfect sense. So, I suppose if this is true, a lot of the INTJ's here suffer cognitive distortions frequently. I also think introverted intuition is a very strange creature which can easily lend one to insanity.
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Old 01-23-2008, 09:09 PM   #20
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I recently decided to open my own yoga studio. In an atempt to express all my fabulous ideas to my "infp" brother; he asked me if maybe I was "manic"? I guess having too many ideas or being overly excited is now also a disorder!
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Old 01-24-2008, 03:26 AM   #21
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  Originally Posted by hfortenberry
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Hi all,

I too resent being characterized as somebody with a problem. I am able to fake the small talk when needed and I can successfully attend parties and converse if it is strategically worthwhile. I do not have anxiety in these settings, nor am I shy. In fact, people are often shocked when I tell them I'm an introvert. I've gotten pretty good at pretending to enjoy conversations around the water cooler. The issue is that, deep down, I am INCREDIBLY bored and a bit resentful that I have to fake it so much. I get so bored at social events that I can't wait to get back home to enjoy reading one of my more interesting technical books (for example). Why is this considered such a bad thing. I think it is incredibly awesome that we can entertain ourselves so well.

Life would be so much more fun if I could find people with which to share intensely deep conversations. I rarely find people who want to talk about any subject a fraction of the time I do. I find I am just getting warmed up as they are ready to change the subject. Ho hum... Glad to find this forum!

In relation to interesting topics. I mostly enjoy studying Electromagnetic Propulsion, Physics & the boundaries of the third dimension and what lies in the 4th dimension. However when I goto talk to people about my interest they just tune out cause they can not comprehend what I am talking about.

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Old 01-24-2008, 03:49 AM   #22
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  Originally Posted by hfortenberry
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Hi all,

I too resent being characterized as somebody with a problem. I am able to fake the small talk when needed and I can successfully attend parties and converse if it is strategically worthwhile. I do not have anxiety in these settings, nor am I shy. In fact, people are often shocked when I tell them I'm an introvert. I've gotten pretty good at pretending to enjoy conversations around the water cooler. The issue is that, deep down, I am INCREDIBLY bored and a bit resentful that I have to fake it so much. I get so bored at social events that I can't wait to get back home to enjoy reading one of my more interesting technical books (for example). Why is this considered such a bad thing. I think it is incredibly awesome that we can entertain ourselves so well.

Life would be so much more fun if I could find people with which to share intensely deep conversations. I rarely find people who want to talk about any subject a fraction of the time I do. I find I am just getting warmed up as they are ready to change the subject. Ho hum... Glad to find this forum!

I can fake small talks as well, and I have many friends. Sometimes I'm resentful that I cannot even be myself in front of my friends and am convinced that they need me as much as I do them. When I told one of them that I'm very introverted and don't really need friends most of the time, she was shocked all right.





Camelopardalis added to this post, 1 minutes and 45 seconds later...

  Originally Posted by Nate08
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However when I goto talk to people about my interest they just tune out cause they can not comprehend what I am talking about.

It's either that or they couldn't give less about what you're saying. When I talk about controversial and technical things, they would impatiently wave their hands for me to stop talking because the conversation's boring them already - and it hasn't even started.

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Old 01-28-2008, 11:22 PM   #23
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I think that the reason for the link is simply because we (or at least I am) willing to walk away from dealing with people be it in a relationship or a friendship if I think its to a point where it can't be salvaged. Others see it as so cold, and shocking how we can just cut people off and almost immediately move on so they figure that we must not care about social relationships. In reality its just because we have gone over it in our heads enough that its just isn't visibly bothering us anymore.
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Old 01-29-2008, 12:31 PM   #24
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  Originally Posted by Nate08
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Kind of makes you think, 1% of the population are INTJ along with 1% of the population have this Mental disorder. The links are there.

On another note you would ask why is it that only 1% of the population is INTJ ?

Does the "ALL MIGHTY/ GOD/ ADONAI" Have a Plan for us?

Lol, I always viewed our personality as the most evolved...
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Old 02-01-2008, 12:14 AM   #25
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Okay Seeing we are the lucky 1% We should be able to have discipline & control over our selves to carry out the following: No TV for a week & no Masturbation or sexual release of any kind for a week.
You will be very surprised on how much your thought pattens change. Plus your need for sleep gets less, Your dreams come more vivid, lucid & spiritual. & you find your self contemplating the universe & higher dimensions also beginning to understand things to a higher degree. "For example I am currently studying the IN's & Out's of Electromagnetic Propulsion Technology" Seriously thoe if you want to really expand your level of thought & Motivation, force & spirit. I would recommend trying this. Even try for 2 weeks or even higher. WARNING: You should practice meditation with this. After about 3 days or you will find our self becoming quite dominating somewhat questful to take over your follow peers & the world to that matter. LOL. Other personalities such as all the Extovert personalities when they try this task it sends them wild with rage and to do stupid things. & boy do they become sexually frustrated even after 3 days & somewhat violent. This is why I recommend INTJ's Try this as we have more self control then anyone else.
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