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Personality and Psychological Disorders None
Old 04-09-2012, 07:58 AM   #1
Reizu
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Do you think a person's personality makes them more likely to be diagnosed with certain mental or personality disorders? Example: I'd find it hard to believe that an ESFP would suffer from sociopathy due to their sympathetic and social nature.

Or perhaps it could be mental disorders that affect the personality?

I was wondering what you all think on this topic.
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Old 04-09-2012, 04:32 PM   #2
Arguendo
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I've wondered about this too. Ted Bundy is a sociopath serial killer. He is also an intellect, perfectionist and narcissist.

"Bundy was an unusually organized and calculating criminal who used his extensive knowledge of law enforcement methodologies to elude identification and capture for years.[253] His crime scenes were distributed over large geographic areas; his victim count had risen to at least 20 before it became clear that numerous investigators in widely disparate jurisdictions were hunting the same man."

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I wonder what his personality type is.
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Old 04-09-2012, 04:35 PM   #3
Polymath20
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I think you have it backwards. Chicken/egg type problem.
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Old 04-09-2012, 06:44 PM   #4
reckful
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It seems likely to me that some disorders are at least partly composed of what effectively amount to relatively extreme versions of one or more of the preferences with perhaps neuroticism and/or some additional element also present in the mix.

As one example,
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that suggests that OCPD (obsessive-compulsive personality disorder) may "represent a maladaptive variant of normal range conscientiousness" conscientiousness being the Big 5 version of a J preference.

Similarly, I assume most people with social anxiety disorder are introverts.
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:41 PM   #5
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The thing with psychopaths and sociopaths is that label gets slapped on them after they've violated legal social norms. No chicken or the egg dilemma. The act was committed and consequences were rendered. Such people are not born with an instinct or whatever to do such things, but sure biology influences some people more than others. It's like a disorder that bridges our health and incarceration systems in the US. Many serial killers and the sort are said to have appeared perfectly normal and some were much liked by their peers.

Social anxiety disorder is no better defined as being an extreme introvert than being a classical case of stage fright. I'm not sure I'm truly an introvert so my opinion might be moot, but I do have social anxiety disorder and seemingly paradoxically I excel in domains such as public speaking or mediating a discussion.

There are "disorders" that are genetically caused that have profound influences on personality. Things are far more complicated than 16 different ways a few letters can be arranged.
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:48 PM   #6
reckful
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  Originally Posted by admittedheretic
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Social anxiety disorder is no better defined as being an extreme introvert than being a classical case of stage fright. I'm not sure I'm truly an introvert so my opinion might be moot, but I do have social anxiety disorder and seemingly paradoxically I excel in domains such as public speaking or mediating a discussion.

Perhaps you misunderstood me. I wasn't suggesting that social anxiety disorder was simply extreme introversion.

Also: Feeling substantially more comfortable doing public speaking or mediating a discussion than making small talk with strangers is common for introverts. It's certainly true of me. (Which is not to say that, all other things being equal, someone with a pronounced fear of public speaking isn't probably more likely to be an introvert than an extravert.)

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Old 04-10-2012, 04:19 PM   #7
Espadrille
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  Originally Posted by reckful
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Perhaps you misunderstood me. I wasn't suggesting that social anxiety disorder was simply extreme introversion.

Also: Feeling substantially more comfortable doing public speaking or mediating a discussion than making small talk with strangers is common for introverts. It's certainly true of me. (Which is not to say that, all other things being equal, someone with a pronounced fear of public speaking isn't probably more likely to be an introvert than an extravert.)

As an introvert, I can more easily make small talk than speak in public. One, small talk doesn't mean much to me and two, it's the large number of people in the group or audience that feels threatening.

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Old 04-10-2012, 04:26 PM   #8
reckful
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  Originally Posted by Espadrille
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As an introvert, I can more easily make small talk than speak in public. One, small talk doesn't mean much to me and two, it's the large number of people in the group or audience that feels threatening.

Yep. And I didn't mean to suggest that that combination wasn't also a possibility. For an introvert who's relatively self-confident when it comes to their public speaking abilities (and therefore isn't uncomfortable on those grounds), both the controlled aspect of the presentation, and the fact that there's no pressure for self-disclosure, can end up making it more comfortable, overall, than cocktail-party small talk. But other combinations can lead to other results.

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Old 04-10-2012, 04:37 PM   #9
Espadrille
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  Originally Posted by reckful
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Yep. And I didn't mean to suggest that that combination wasn't also a possibility. For an introvert who's relatively self-confident when it comes to their public speaking abilities (and therefore isn't uncomfortable on those grounds), both the controlled aspect of the presentation, and the fact that there's no pressure for self-disclosure, can end up making it more comfortable, overall, than cocktail-party small talk. But other combinations can lead to other results.

Yes, and I can add that I have been practicing speaking out in groups and in public and it's less scary each time. I also did a workshop on public speaking. I am pleasantly surprised that I am changing in that direction.

(And I didn't mean to imply that you were wrong, at all.)

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Old 04-11-2012, 01:11 AM   #10
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yes, i think there are situations where personality type affects the development of certain types of disorders. but there is limited research into how and why, and it seems its less of an influencer than things like environment and personal relations... but im always interested in hearing about more research on this.
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Old 04-11-2012, 04:57 AM   #11
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INTP -> schizoid
INTJ -> schizotypal
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