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  1. FurElise
    05-26-2015 07:38 PM
    FurElise
    Hi! I have to post my response to you about the bystander effect here because administration deleted my thread (said it was advertising):

    Originally Posted by RavenRawne View Post
    Hi!

    I think you've made an interesting link between excluding some individuals from a group, and the mentioned bystander effect. Even though I think it's not the root cause, it surely can strengthen the established status quo.

    ...

    Back to topic at hand - for most students, the classroom is like a prison. Not literally, but there's the same social mechanic - you can't get out (unless you move to to a different school), and you're stuck with those people for a few years, so either you'll play like others or get kicked out of the field. And remeber about all those group projects - you can't roll all alone, even if you don't need help with grades you still need warm bodies to fill up space in your group.

    So, you're stuck in there and at some time will have to gather a party in order to complete a group quest... So, whenever you want it or not, you have to, ahem, make some friends!

    ...

    So that's the first case of "bystander effect" in action - you're not like us, so we don't want you. Simple and efficient. Quite understandable, actually.

    For the second case, we need to go back to the prison. You're stuck here, remember? So what happens if you're deemed "unworthy"? I mean - at some point you get the unfortunate attention of someone in a high position in the class (let's keep it simple - a bully that no one wants to upset and pretends to be best pals with, just to be left in peace) , and suddenly it's like you were the worst person in the class. No one wants to even talk to you out of fear, because stepping out of line will get them in the same position as you are.

    Well, been there, done that - I won't lie. Al you can do is assemble the Avengers... I mean, band with other mistits and try to make do. Who knows, maybe you'll establish a new group and rise up again.

    You've mentioned about benefits of looking around and reaching out to other people - while technically it's all true and might actually work, kids usually hold on to their groups rather tight, since it's a lifeline of sorts. Sure, one can have many friends, but what if your other friends see you with that lonely person and think you hang out with "losers"? You'll get kiced out! So, in my opinion, the primary cause of people being socially cut out in classrooms is the fear of rejection in those already established. Remember, kids can be cruel, for no apparent reason.

    ...

    Wow, nice wall 'o text I have here... Here's to hoping someone will find the time to read it.




    Hello, RavenRawne. Thanks for your response. Yes, I had considered the fear of becoming also an outcast as one reason for excluding the "misfits." Now my next question is thus: does this same "status quo" exist in adult classes (when the students are 18 years old and older)?
  2. Jezebel
    10-07-2012 12:59 PM
    Jezebel commented on Is something missing?
    Done.
  3. pip
    10-01-2012 12:58 AM
    pip commented on Brony talk
    Sad pic for a sad feeling

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  • About RavenRawne
    Gender
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    Warsaw, Poland (that country east of Germany)
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    Warhammer 40k, Ponies, Public Health, psychology, animals, history, my car, and some other things
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    Healthcare Administration
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    MBTI Type
    InTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6
    Global 5/SLOAN
    |R|xOEI
    Astrology Sign
    Leo
    Brain Dominance
    Left

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