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KBRod
06-26-2008, 07:05 PM
Hello all-

I've browsed the forum for awhile and finally decided to join.

I'm currently in college studying chemical engineering, but I'll probably stay to get an advanced degree working in a nanomaterials lab.

Nice to find a place where plenty of fellow INTJs frequent!

notoppings
06-26-2008, 07:26 PM
Glad to have you, I hope you will enjoy your time here.

Monte314
06-26-2008, 08:16 PM
Chem-E, huh? You must be pretty smart.

So, does the Debye-Hückel limiting law actually figure into practical applications, or is it just a descriptive construct?

KBRod
06-26-2008, 08:35 PM
So, does the Debye-Hückel limiting law actually figure into practical applications, or is it just a descriptive construct?

After getting thoroughly blasted by it and chemical activities in thermodynamics, I've decided that while it has its theoretical "uses," I have little faith in its industrial use (especially when you think about "industry standards"). Far better to model it using real data and use the standard chemical engineer approach.

A mathematician, a physicist, and a chemical engineer are asked to find the volume of a rubber band ball.

The mathematician creates an integral and evaluates it.

The physicist measures the amount of water that the rubber band ball displaces.

The chemical engineer measures its diameter and then looks up the volume in the rubber band ball table.

Maybe if they developed a working chemical potentiometer . . .

Monte314
06-26-2008, 10:00 PM
Hee! Hee! Hee!

Elfrun
06-27-2008, 07:26 AM
*Passes Monte some ventolin* You kay there bud ;)

Welcome KBRod *waves*

rwyatt365
06-27-2008, 09:20 AM
Welcome to the forum.

Do all Chem-E's smell funny, or are you just glad to see us? :rolleyes:

KBRod
06-27-2008, 02:50 PM
Do all Chem-E's smell funny, or are you just glad to see us? :rolleyes:


That depends on a few factors: What time it is, the day of the week, and how long I've been in "engineer mode" in the computer lab! ;)

Oberon
06-27-2008, 05:27 PM
Wow, Im not the only person studying nanotechnology. Thats pretty cool. Do you have any experiance or are you stuck relying on books and whatever articles you find like me, and just need a (few) highspeed atomic force microscopes and the traditional afms as well? Anyways welcome.

KBRod
06-27-2008, 06:41 PM
Do you have any experiance or are you stuck relying on books and whatever articles you find like me, and just need a (few) highspeed atomic force microscopes and the traditional afms as well? Anyways welcome.

I currently work in a lab where we use nanoparticles to make devices. I have some experience in nanoparticle synthesis, and now I'm trying to make useful things out of them.

Articles that apply to what you're actually doing in the lab are like oases in the desert sometimes, but they're really nice to have. Semiconductor books and bandgap theory are nice, too.

We have (I'm assuming) a traditional afm, but we also use transmission electron microscopy to view synthesized nanoparticles and a current vs. voltage setup. One of the main things we look at is how electricity flows through networks of nanoparticles.

Thanks for the warm welcome all!