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Mogura
04-18-2008, 12:56 AM
I am sure that in discussing careers with a variety of individuals, the phrase, "it was my calling" must have come up one time or another. Often I have heard this phrase (or paraphrase thereof) in relation to careers such as teaching, nursing, or creative art--usually F type careers.

Have you ever known an INTJ to use an explanation of this sort in expressing how he/she selected his/her career? To me, it sounds kind of odd:

A: So how did you end up choosing a career in embedded systems programming?
B: Oh, it wasn't that I chose it. Rather, it chose me. It was my calling...

Well, it's a big wide world out there and maybe to some of you such a conversational exchange doesn't sound so strange.

Anyway, have you ever felt that your career was a calling? Or have you known of INTJs to describe his/her career as a calling?

Phrixos
04-18-2008, 01:02 AM
I'm a communications tech at an ISP. I did nothing to get there, never even knew much computers before i went there. I just happen to be good at it, I hate it though. Just is all logical and i grasp the concept of communication.

Wouldn't say it is my calling. It's just what I'm doing now. I have much larger ambitions for business. That is my calling.

Tenacious B
04-19-2008, 02:28 AM
I'm not sure I could have a calling. I have been very involved and serious about many subjects over the years, but I can't imagine dedicating my life to just one.

Victoria Silver
04-19-2008, 02:55 AM
The notion of a "calling" seems strange to me. You may have a great passion for some kind of work, but that seems different. I suppose this represents the inward-looking orientation of an INTJ. The profession doesn't choose you; you choose it.

Daniel
04-19-2008, 07:21 AM
I think yes, it is applicable. I believe I had a calling for architecture. I imagine a calling is something that you are interesting from as early as childhood. But theese are more basic careers. A fireman, because you see buildings on fire, an architect, because you see building all arround you, a scientist because you saw "dexters laboratory", a doctor because you went to a hospital.
You don't get a calling to be a system analyst or a biochemist from an early age.

koonac
04-19-2008, 07:33 AM
I had a "calling" to be a scientist or an astronaut when I was young.. :cheesy: But I'm studying something else now in Uni tho'. However deep inside I still wanna be an Astronaut! ;D

djsroffel
04-20-2008, 01:49 AM
That seemed odd to me as well, but over the years one thing has remained constant in all the jobs and things I've worked in over the last 19 years. Psychology is my calling and that is what I am studying now in university at the age of 32. Up until recently, the idea of a "calling" was strange to me. Now that I've found mine, it is not as strange

mental drift
04-20-2008, 01:57 AM
That seemed odd to me as well, but over the years one thing has remained constant in all the jobs and things I've worked in over the last 19 years. Psychology is my calling and that is what I am studying now in university at the age of 32. Up until recently, the idea of a "calling" was strange to me. Now that I've found mine, it is not as strange

That's cool djsroffel, I am currently studying psych (social) myself at 32, but I wouldn't consider it my calling. I guess if I somehow in my lifetime became an architect I might would say that, because it's my desire and looking less and less plausible.

the human iPod
04-20-2008, 03:46 AM
When I was younger I had a strong passion to become a videogame programmer, which still holds true to this day. I just haven't gotten my feet wet with programming, yet. >_<

vaguely dissatisfied
04-20-2008, 06:34 AM
No........and I'll tell you why..............

I think that the INTJ mind works so differently from other types that 'jobs' or 'careers' don't have the significance for an INTJ that they do for others. Speaking for myself, I see a job as a kind of fun activity that I get paid for (jobs I like....I mean) and a career as a challenge that I am initially excited to meet and overcome and then rapidly get bored with.

The other big difference I see in myself vs. most others is that I cannot indentify 'who I am' based on 'what I do'. My career or job does not define me ...... at all. I could be ditch digging one day and flying to the moon the next and it would have absolutely no impact on my personal feelings of who I am and what I'm worth. As a matter of fact, I can't indentify 'who I am' with alot of the usual things 'normal' people indentify with.

Timdotz
04-20-2008, 07:43 AM
No........and I'll tell you why..............

I think that the INTJ mind works so differently from other types that 'jobs' or 'careers' don't have the significance for an INTJ that they do for others. Speaking for myself, I see a job as a kind of fun activity that I get paid for (jobs I like....I mean) and a career as a challenge that I am initially excited to meet and overcome and then rapidly get bored with.

The other big difference I see in myself vs. most others is that I cannot indentify 'who I am' based on 'what I do'. My career or job does not define me ...... at all. I could be ditch digging one day and flying to the moon the next and it would have absolutely no impact on my personal feelings of who I am and what I'm worth. As a matter of fact, I can't indentify 'who I am' with alot of the usual things 'normal' people indentify with.

I have to agree with every word from you there, because I share the same experience. Although I'm doing a degree for Computer Systems, I wish to be a 'Master (not jack) of all Trades'...

Anat
04-20-2008, 07:56 AM
I agree with you, too, Vaguelly Dissatisfied... I too do not identify work with my identity, as in 'I am my job'...
I based my choice of work on an analysis of the jobs available, my background, and an analysis of what I'm capable of doing and what I like doing. Because of this approach, I have done a lot of different jobs. Journalism, secretary, and right now working with prostitutes as a representative of the city council of a town close to where I live. Sometimes I didn't liked my job - working as a secretary can be hell if your boss is an idiot :scared: but in general I was able to find work that interested me. I wouldn't call it a calling, but it's deeply satisfying work that gives me an opportunity to help someone else and develop myself/learn new things at the same time. And that feels good....

Santana28
04-21-2008, 12:45 PM
i have a new "calling" about every 6 months or so!

But if you want a list...not in chronological order...

-archaeologist
-architect-
-pilot
-military pilot
-graphic designer
-writer
-CIA
-firefighter
-police
-psychologist
-commercial fishing
...and the list goes on.

NightHeron8
05-03-2008, 10:56 AM
Yeah, there are many things, fields, etc. that interest me - sometimes immensely, but as far as coming across one or two that I'd like to give myself over to for the next 40 years? I don't think so. More of what gets my focus, and perhaps this is a calling in the making itself, is tracking the patterns of learning between these various fields. I directed some theatre a couple years ago and found in my Steiner theatrical mysticism elements of Bernoulli and geometry. When I had to rehearse the chorus I sang in again geometry was there as well as chem. In fencing, history and music of course. When you explain these things with the other people you're working with, sometimes it blows their minds a little bit. They think it's original and happening. Or something. It's just a trick of the trade. But yet, if my 'official job' was to track these patterns, I wouldn't enjoy it as much and would probably 'officially' blow it off, though I would probably continue playing with it in my own head just to pass the time. So yeah, computer programming? No cigar.

Hmm, some jobs of interest then?...
Director
Artist
Conductor
trainer (equine)
forensic science
architect
woodworking/construction
mechanic
medieval language&studies
psychology
criminology

I guess my stuff focuses on 1) how minds work and perceive the same things differently 2) language as it ties to working purpose and 3) efficiency.

Double Victory
05-03-2008, 12:12 PM
A: So how did you end up choosing a career in embedded systems programming?
B: Oh, it wasn't that I chose it. Rather, it chose me. It was my calling...

That made me laugh.

If INTJs are capable of being called into some sort of career field, I don't think it's the actual job itself that's doing the calling, but more the implications behind the job. I think that INTJs want to do something productive, useful, and challenging, and therefore oftentimes find themselves in jobs like programming, engineering, or science. It may sound like embedded systems programming couldn't be someone's dream, and it certainly sounds weird to say it was your calling, but if the job is satisfying then it basically amounts to the same thing.

It may just be that INTJs don't dream as much about things like helping people (psychiatry, doctor) or fame (acting, singing). Maybe we just dream more about accomplishing something.

I guess it's just a bad way to phrase things. The conversation should go more like:

A: So how did you end up choosing a career in embedded systems programming?
B: I've always been called into fields that challenge my mind and produce useful results. Embedded systems programming entailed all of these things, and so we just seemed to fit together.


Personally, I'm in an AFROTC program right now. I have no idea what kind of job I want to shoot for. AFROTC cadets have their jobs chosen for them based on a lot of different factors. It's not so much the job itself that matters, as much as what I feel I will be doing as an officer in the Air Force in general. I never had any dreams or callings to specific jobs, but I've browsed a lot of fields (all of which I've ended up hating), and this one just seems like it's where I'm "supposed" to be. That's probably as close as I'll get to a calling.

Motor Jax
05-03-2008, 12:33 PM
INTJ buddy and myself actually do the same thing

work on networks, hardware and software, fiber optics, routers, ATM switches, etc...


and before he retired, he was in the Navy doing the the same thing i do now

Erika Redmark
05-03-2008, 01:39 PM
I remember at the end of high school when everyone talked about where they were going to college and what they wanted to study, and I was amazed at how many people wanted to be doctors so they could help people, or lawyers so they could fight for the rights of the downtrodden, or teachers so they could help build the new generation and whatnot, and that sort of thing. I felt kind of like a selfish jerk (although it doesn't bother me so much anymore) because my choice of field was more based on a thought process like "Whatever I go to college for, I'll end up knowing quite a lot about. Linguistics would be a pretty awesome field to know a lot about." And I'm considering studying musicology for the same reason. I definitely feel like I chose (or am in the process of choosing) my field, and not the other way around.

True Rune
05-04-2008, 11:55 PM
Yes, I believe one can be called. But I'm religious.

bmartinl
05-08-2008, 04:37 AM
I'm going into medicine, which is one of those fields that apparently one must be "called upon" to do. Not so with me. I chose it because it's challenging, useful, and I'll never be bored. I decided to do it at age 23, so it wasn't like I've "wanted to be a doctor forever." I think some people are drawn to certain careers but mostly it's fuzzy. People end up in places they don't expect.

schmidt
05-08-2008, 08:37 AM
I wouldn't say it was a calling even though I've known for a long time (since i was somewhere between 9 and 13 years old) that computers would be my thing.

It's more of the general interest of problem solving and to systematize information that sort of landed me here.

Mogura
05-08-2008, 06:12 PM
I wouldn't say it was a calling even though I've known for a long time (since i was somewhere between 9 and 13 years old) that computers would be my thing.

It's more of the general interest of problem solving and to systematize information that sort of landed me here.

Where is "here"? I mean which field of computers are you in?

schmidt
06-23-2008, 05:24 AM
Where is "here"? I mean which field of computers are you in?

I am currently a Consultant/*nix System Administrator but I will probably focus on embedded systems when I start studying again.

Antares
06-23-2008, 05:28 AM
"It chose me" is just a classical example of people getting delusions of grandeur. Careers don't choose people. Get real. It's basically saying "I can't resist. This career is so for me." Except they're trying to give it the 'fate' touch to it. Just like in Harry Potter, where the wand chooses the wizard. As for me, no career or a particular field has 'chosen' me yet. I feel left out *sniff* No intangible, unintelligent object wants me. Nah. I just don't feel the urge to 'choose' anything yet. They're all unworthy as for now. I love my career as a student. I'll worry about that when the time comes.

curiousjane
06-23-2008, 06:55 AM
Well, I've yet to meet an INTJ in real life yet who didn't like what they did and find a lot of validation and purpose in it. My uncle saves (entire country's) coastlines from environmental distress and teaches the inhabitants and governments to change things so that marine life can thrive again. He's done it for my entire life (28 years, in case anyone is wondering). He's had one job this entire time, working for his university in this capacity. I don't know if he'd say it was a calling, but he certainly hasn't moved on from it. That requires a certain level of investment that one doesn't have to "just a job."

Others I've known have found a deep level of similar personal fulfillment from a job well done. They have typically chosen careers that they had competencies in and could perform above par.

I don't know if that is a "calling" or if it is just plain common sense.

mkay
06-23-2008, 11:38 AM
I could see a calling for some people, like those who join the clergy or teach maybe. I think "helpers" are more likely to feel a calling, something someone can see doing their whole working life. Even though I found a first career that I loved, I always figured I would do it till I'd had all my fun, then move on to something different, so I could learn anew.

I stumbled across journalism at age 14, and it fit me in a way that some people might see as a calling, but I wouldn't. I started freelancing in high school, making good money for a teen. I decided that was what I wanted to do, so I majored in print journalism, did several summer internships and graduated with a job offer. Journalism let me capitalize on my love of language and learning, let leverage my personality, let me feel like I was contributing. I also got to work in a bunch of great cities and had my moving costs paid every time. One of the best things was the smart people I got to work with. I never expected to make much money because it's a very competitive field, but I did. That was icing.

To me, that's the closest I'll ever get to a calling -- a job that meets my interests, personality and motivations. At age 39, I recently left journalism to find new challenges and am looking for something that will be similarly satisfying.

SShack
06-23-2008, 12:08 PM
I could see a calling for some people, like those who join the clergy or teach maybe. I think "helpers" are more likely to feel a calling, something someone can see doing their whole working life. Even though I found a first career that I loved, I always figured I would do it till I'd had all my fun, then move on to something different, so I could learn anew.

I stumbled across journalism at age 14, and it fit me in a way that some people might see as a calling, but I wouldn't. I started freelancing in high school, making good money for a teen. I decided that was what I wanted to do, so I majored in print journalism, did several summer internships and graduated with a job offer. Journalism let me capitalize on my love of language and learning, let leverage my personality, let me feel like I was contributing. I also got to work in a bunch of great cities and had my moving costs paid every time. One of the best things was the smart people I got to work with. I never expected to make much money because it's a very competitive field, but I did. That was icing.

To me, that's the closest I'll ever get to a calling -- a job that meets my interests, personality and motivations. At age 39, I recently left journalism to find new challenges and am looking for something that will be similarly satisfying.

I didn't realize we were in the same line of work (until recently for you). I wonder if there's anything significant about that or if it's just a coincidence. I may be leaving work myself in the "traditional" media role but will still be working for the media in a different capacity soon.

mkay
06-23-2008, 01:51 PM
I didn't realize we were in the same line of work (until recently for you). I wonder if there's anything significant about that or if it's just a coincidence. I may be leaving work myself in the "traditional" media role but will still be working for the media in a different capacity soon.

I think it's a meeting of personality and work, not a coincidence. I didn't find out about MBTI till recently, but I've since read that journalism is one of the jobs that fit ENTPs best. I was lucky to have found it. It was definitely not a job my immigrant parents envisioned for me. They weren't happy with my choice, but I did my own thing.

I was a bookworm, learned writing through osmosis, wandered into high school newspapering, was encouraged to apply for a freelance spot at my community paper because of my writing. When I started making money, I was amazed you could get paid for doing something so fun.

Feel free to send me a private message if you'd like to continue the conversation. I don't want to derail the thread with ENTP / journalism stuff.

redbaren
06-24-2008, 01:20 PM
I have a strong "calling" for being a pilot, now i need to get me some flight books and then I am set.

seoa
06-24-2008, 06:36 PM
"having a calling" is justification for low pay. as in, the jobs that people typically feel "called" into (teaching, social work, nursing, clergy) have enough people who will do them regardless of the T&Cs...

which makes "being called" a pretty illogical choice :)

mkay
06-24-2008, 07:24 PM
I think you're confusing logic with what makes you happy. Some people can be happy without a lot of money.

Katie
06-25-2008, 08:09 AM
I do think we choose in areas of interest, ability, and where we can perform above par. INTJ's typically are not socially motivated into helper type positions, but have various levels of social tolerance. We seek the "guts" of what appeals ... for example,

The WHAT that attracted me into an untypical "secretarial" direction when very young is fitting: the secretary I first observed in great detail was a cream-of-the-crop professional, and her SYSTEM was ergonomically perfect! That blew me away to watch how she made her work flow through her area - in ultimate comfort (or so I thought), looking both beautiful and authoritative. Over the years, I've learned I am talented in that type of organization, setting up of systems, and in the ability to discern the goals, messages, intentions, etc in order to choose the best remedy - as well as in written communications, way before learning why I was so different than most of those typically in my field. It's true - they're typically not ambitious, but my ambitions are to keep learning / growing in the same interest that attracted me.

I occassionally run into an old-timer who thinks it's all about typing fast (grin) ... for years, although I could produce at the levels of the top typist in any office, I couldn't test well and had to sell myself on the excellence of my writing skills - thank goodness that focus changed along with so much else in the field. A few years into it and appropriately disillusioned, I believed I'd not yet found the best industry / role fit, so set out to try on various roles in various industries to try and find a "fit" ... the transferring / growing of skills kept me challenged for awhile, and learning a new industries' focus met an "input" need. My organizational talents can hit the ground running and have provided significant improvements in process, knowledge-based strategies, and liaison efforts whether at regular or contract positions ... after awhile, they're all gigs ... not surprisingly, about half my career has been contract work.

Today, it's STILL the WHAT ELSE that matters to me ... the pride of knowing the impact I've made / can make is sufficient, but the effort requires an employer who desires or at least appreciates improvements over time. Today's trends finally fit, and I've just accepted a position with a CEO who's extremely and tactfully direct, is continual-improvement focused, and has built a great team. This should keep me wanting to stay for the long haul after the learning curve - as I've also learned to keep my skills employed in my personal life.

SiMey
06-29-2008, 09:26 AM
I'm still waiting for the Australian Cricket Team to call me, but it seems they have been playing well enough lately without my help. Within the next few years I'll have to face the fact that they may never call (sob).

Not playing any form of organised cricket probably does not help my case but I can live in hope. On second thought, spending all that time with 10 other guys might get too much. Still, I'd get more personal space on a cricket field than in cubicle land.

I would love to know what my calling is; what would be a great job for me. I have no idea. As a kid the only thing I ever joked about was wanting to supervise other people. People generally say I am good at this, but it takes a fair bit of effort on my behalf.

I just keep trying to change jobs every few years to keep myself entertained and generally view challenges at work as fun.

I think (hope) my wife has found hers. A creative outlet where she makes people feel and look good. Despite that she has a uni degree, I am supporting her to learn to become a hairdresser.

Tulula
07-01-2008, 11:23 PM
I began my career straight out of highschool working as a teacher's assistant with emotionally handicapped/mentally challenged children -- I loved, loved, loved working with the mentally challenged -- especially because it was like I could see which sparkplugs were firing and which weren't, and luckily enough, with some of the children, I figured out how to bridge some of those gaps.

I was told at that time, if I went back to school and got a degree, I could write my own meal ticket.

Instead, being the good little southern baptist doormat, I got married. The hubby hated the job (because I smelled bad when I got home) -- actually, he hated me but just hadn't figured it out yet -- but only after I had his child. I left him when she was 14 months old which gave him the "perfect" excuse to become a deadbeat dad.

While we were still married, I got a job as a secretary, then got divorced, finally (when my daughter turned 14 years old) I went to college fulltime, worked fulltime and attempted to maintain a fulltime relationship.

Right out of college I became an insurance agent -- which I !!!!hate!!!! I absolutely loved being a secretary in comparison to being an insurance agent -- but only because it allowed me to have time to use my brain -- which you really, really don't have to do when you are an insurance agent -- you just need to know how insurance works and then how to deal with people, and now I am recently unemployed and trying to figure out exactly how to find a job (making money) within the area of my ??calling?? . . . . .

As I have matured, I realized that it wasn't actually the children I liked working with so much as the challenge of figuring out how their little minds worked, what they could do and what they couldn't do, what were their frustration triggers, what were their happy triggers -- how did they see the world from their eyes and how could I help them fit into the world with what they had to work with -- which ultimately meant figuring out their personality patterns, then trying to redirect some of their firing paths so that they could function with the least amount of frustration possible while teaching them how to find a place of peace within themselves. (I know that all sounds weird, but this is how my mind works, and I'm hoping that y'all will understand that -- because nobody I know ever does!)

Anyway, since then, I have found that I have an extreme interest in the area of cognitive neuroscience (however, at my age, it's probably a little late for that) so I'm looking for something I can do within that area -- any ideas or better yet, job offers, would be greatly appreciated (heheheheh!)

So, in answer to the question as to whether people have callings, I do think that some of us have a ??calling?? -- or at least area(s) of expertise that we somehow understand without really understanding why/how we understand them.

zibber
07-02-2008, 10:40 AM
Anyway, since then, I have found that I have an extreme interest in the area of cognitive neuroscience (however, at my age, it's probably a little late for that) so I'm looking for something I can do within that area -- any ideas or better yet, job offers, would be greatly appreciated (heheheheh!)

University's not an option? It's not bound to age, at least not where I come from. In Amsterdam, there's tons of night classes.

normanajn
07-08-2008, 03:45 PM
The idea of a calling is very real in an INTJ. It stems mainly from a strong "N" trait in the INTJ giving an intuitive direction which is then reinforced by the TJ aspects of their analytic patterns.

The better question really is more one of "What is the calling of the INTJ?", and for that there is an answer that is so universal that it in many ways defines the personality.

"To understand." is the call. To understand everything around us, its design, its function, its application, it's extension, is character in every aspect imaginable.

For myself the answer to the call was to plunge into physics, and as a natural consequence into mathematics. The realization of that call was clear from a very early age. I wanted to understand, and the fields of understanding were called physics for the study and description of the physical world, and called philosophy for the world of the interior. As strange as it may seem, this notion of the physicist/philosopher is more the norm for the INTJ than any other. In academia these paths of introspective investigation are the havens to which INTJs come naturally, their intuitive investigative nature not allowing for anything but such a choice, to fulfill their need for understanding.

Doppelbock
07-08-2008, 03:56 PM
If by "Calling" you mean something you are passionate about and just can't resist, then I do think that can happen to INTJ's.

Case in point: On July 28, I start a new job at a company in Houston, TX. I'll be working at Johnson Space Center on the new Constellation program. I've wanted to do this my whole life but my hesitancy to move away from my friends and family as a young college graduate led my career down a different path. But now, 20 years after I started my career, it's gonna happen. Ultimately, I couldn't resist.

kmolleja
07-08-2008, 04:14 PM
I feel the same way, there are too many interesting fields to devote everything to just one. This coming from a guy with a BS in Biology, a law degree and an MBA. I can't decide which I like best.

scholarwarrior
07-09-2008, 03:36 AM
One of my professors told me that INTJ is a very common type for clinical psychologists, which was somewhat reassuring.
I don't know if its a calling. That same professor said that most psychologists study that field initially to figure out their own problems. I believe it. So, if I had resolved my problems earlier in life, I suppose I might be studying something entirely different, and i can't imagine what... When I think about it, it seems that just about all of my interests stem out of my personality quirks. If I worked long enough to address what i see as my 'problems', its probably enough changes I might not even be INTJ after that... Interesting.

deuteros
07-11-2008, 11:40 PM
I definitely do not feel defined by my career. I'm an accountant but I don't really like it all that much. To me it's just a job and I don't have the desire to climb the corporate ladder.

I would really like to go back to school and do something I really enjoyed. I'd like to do botany because I am really fascinated with plants and how useful they are.

Grant
07-12-2008, 08:50 PM
I like making things make sense and easy to use. I got into web design ten years ago and still love it, although I have never liked any of my jobs doing it :-) Basically at some point I always seem to get stuck under a control freak or in with a group of people who are not exactly INTJ friendly. I still get an enormous kick out of putting together business goals with user needs and designing something that satisfies both and is easy to use. That sense of accomplishment for me is as good as it gets.

Still, I've never put myself in a position to be promoted (always leave after 2 years or sooner), and the idea of getting more into managing people than designing websites and applications is very unappealing to me. Im 38 now and it may get a bit ridiculous to be a web designer at 45 or 50 so Ive got to come up with something else I think.

Plus the folks coming out of college now all seem to need to work together constantly in groups, and Im asked more and more to co-design everything with people I may or may not respect, and if I don't respect them it can get ugly. Seems like the world is slowly changing into a sort of hive-work mentality that I just can't stomach.

Im rambling, short version is that, looking retroactively Id say design fits me very well. On the other hand, the business world seems to be slowly pushing this INTJ out, and my plan now is to just work my butt off creating my own web business as fast as I can. If Im self employed, Ill be able to love my "calling" AND my job.

Tulula
07-19-2008, 08:50 PM
University's not an option? It's not bound to age, at least not where I come from. In Amsterdam, there's tons of night classes.



If I lived in Amsterdam, I'd be "bound" for the coffee shops! LOL!

Seriously though, money, to pay for the night classes (and to pay to get there nowadays) is a major factor at this point -- but I haven't ruled classes out -- just the probability of becomeing an Neuroscientist before the age of 100. Thanks for you input!

volk
10-30-2008, 06:23 PM
Now, here is my view on the subject: Either you chose a career based on the goals you want to achieve in life, or you the career choses you and you become a slave of society. If you have goals and you are truly willing to do whatever it takes to reach them then career becomes something of a side effect of your journey.

intellael
11-10-2008, 10:11 AM
The idea of a calling is very real in an INTJ. It stems mainly from a strong "N" trait in the INTJ giving an intuitive direction which is then reinforced by the TJ aspects of their analytic patterns.

The better question really is more one of "What is the calling of the INTJ?", and for that there is an answer that is so universal that it in many ways defines the personality.

"To understand." is the call. To understand everything around us, its design, its function, its application, it's extension, is character in every aspect imaginable.

For myself the answer to the call was to plunge into physics, and as a natural consequence into mathematics. The realization of that call was clear from a very early age. I wanted to understand, and the fields of understanding were called physics for the study and description of the physical world, and called philosophy for the world of the interior. As strange as it may seem, this notion of the physicist/philosopher is more the norm for the INTJ than any other. In academia these paths of introspective investigation are the havens to which INTJs come naturally, their intuitive investigative nature not allowing for anything but such a choice, to fulfill their need for understanding.

Exactly... BTW: We chose similar paths physics and mathematics. I am currently a student in my 30s. Before deciding to return to school, I worked a few jobs that just didn't quite satisfy that need/desire; to know/figure out. In addition to understanding, we want to build. Careers like architect, lawyer, programmer, analysts, researcher, scientists, professors, strategists, just to name a few, all have at the core "knowing" and "building"(planning). Which is why many INTJs flock toward certain fields. A "calling" is not conscious. It is realized when one looks back and analyzes why or why one didn't like a particular career choice.

Lainy
11-10-2008, 12:56 PM
My current job pays well enough for me to pay for my studies, I like it but it's not something to be maintained for very long.

I want to be an engineer, I'm not being able to study as hard as I would like to but I will graduate no matter what! It's something that I enjoy and can also get a good salary so it's 50% each and I can handle that.

There was no calling for me.