PDA

View Full Version : Charitiy


Hdier
11-29-2007, 09:50 AM
I wasn't sure where to put this topic, but this seemed to be the best place; I recently (within the last month or so) became very interested in charities, and I was wondering if most INTJ's were.

BTW, if anyone is interested, To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 2 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. is fighting to end poverty, To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 2 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. will donate to a charity of your choice whenever you search with them, and To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 2 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. will dontate 10 grains of rice to the United Nations to help end world hunger whenever you correctly define an English word (sorry; that wasn't the point of the thread, but I couldn't resist; it is about charities, after all).

(I remembered to check the 'poll' box. Yeah!)

orange
11-29-2007, 12:21 PM
i give a lot of time.

justmeiguess
11-29-2007, 01:17 PM
I donate when I can, though it does seem that I'm always out of change when I walk past a charity box. That's not an excuse, it's true! Then I always get that look from the person collecting and I feel guilty but it's not my fault I'm a poor student!

In a side note we had 'enforced' charity at work the other day. You had to pay 1 a day between Friday and Sunday to wear jeans at work and if you didn't wear jeans you had to pay 2! While it was for a good cause I'm not entirely sure of the ethics involved in forcing someone to give to charity, especially considering some people didn't even own any jeans!

Hdier
11-29-2007, 01:23 PM
I keep the coin change I get at lunch for that, so that I almost always have something.

In a side note about a side note, I agree. Enforced charity is bad, and I'd want to be able to choose the charity I donate to.

banzai
11-29-2007, 04:20 PM
I enjoy giving to charity on my own time...

What I don't like is being asked to give to charity. If I wanted to give to charity, I would go find one I deem worthy and donate, not just because someone is trying to make me feel pressured into it.

For example, it hasn't been uncommon at movie theaters to be asked "would you like to donate $1 to blah-blah-blah in addition to your ticket purchase?" and it bothers me when I have to look stingy when I tell them no.

I also think it's stupid that anyone would feel self-righteous for donating in such a case when they wouldn't have thought to do it otherwise.

shaforostoff
12-01-2007, 11:23 AM
developing open source software (see kde.org)

BlackHawk
12-01-2007, 05:44 PM
Time and Ideas. I help local charities with ideas on fundraising and organization, as well as the usual "volunteer hours."

ShaiGar
12-02-2007, 05:14 AM
Not a christian but I agree with what jesus said.
Give anonymously, without fanfare. Being told to give is coercion not charity.

Duncan Cade
12-03-2007, 08:09 AM
I'd love to give time and wealth for the greater good, but it's just useless the way it is.
Donating 5 dollars to some African Food project won't change anything, things aren't organised and all.
I want bigscale projects to make a better world.

Hdier
12-03-2007, 11:19 AM
Do you think that the United Nations is organized? They are trying to end world hunger, and To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 2 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. will help you donate rice for little more than some time and cognitive energy.

INTJoe
12-04-2007, 01:59 PM
Typically, I don't do charity stuff.

I follow Dave Ramsey's financial guideline in which he says charity should come after you've proven you can own a home, take care of your kids, and be financially prepared for the future (retirement).

My plan is to take care of my personal responsibilities first, then donate a lot as I get older. This is known as "Level 7" of the Dave Ramsey plan. And sometimes when a charity gets pushy with me, I'll just say "We're not on level 7 yet" and walk away. lol.

But seriously, charity should be done by old rich people. It's too much of a burden for young folks. Economically, it doesn't make sense. Look at Warren Buffet who just gave away 30 Billion+ to charity. He's really good at making money so he concentrated on making a lot of money all his life, then knew he could take a giant chunk and just give it away because his responsibilities were in order. I think it's more efficient this way and better for the middle-class type families.


EDITED TO ADD: What is the most righteous charity in which to give? Cancer research? When I do give, I want to give to the most righteous (and efficient) charity out there.

Cancer can hit anybody at any time, man or woman, and in many cases, it has nothing to do with your lifestyle. It is random and lethal. Cancer needs to go.

I think there are many charities out there that are quite silly. I won't name them, because it isn't the spirit of the thread and I don't want to anger people, but I think a lot of people give to "low priority" charities.

Hdier
12-04-2007, 03:52 PM
I agree that you should be secure yourself, because dehydrating yourself to death to get a toy for a random 8 year old on the street is stupid (exaggeration).

In response to your question, I would say that you can't really say that one charity is better than another, because they are so different. However, if I personally had to choose, I would say poverty because it causes so many other problems.


However, the one thing I like about To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 2 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. (sorry to mention it again, but I really like it and just found out about it; I tend to be a bit overzealous about things when I am first introduced to them) is that it doesn't cost anything, and if you have a laptop then you can donate while you are waiting for a bus, or on a bus, or something. Otherwise, you can do what I do and donate when you are bored (generally in school for me), because you just click on responses in order to help end hunger.

deicruxified
12-04-2007, 05:05 PM
i donate a lot. i do tithing and send the 10% either to church or to a chosen charity. then i still donate for environmental projects in our organization. my dad finds this "unhealthy" but i'm single and i don't have my own family yet. i find it nonsensical to bulk up your stash. i still save money but not excessively.

INTJoe
12-04-2007, 06:14 PM
i find it nonsensical to bulk up your stash. i still save money but not excessively.

Why nonsensical?

mielikki
12-05-2007, 02:17 AM
I donate to a specific charity through payroll deduction. I have received quite a few services from this particular organization for my special needs child, so I like to give something back.

INTJoe
12-05-2007, 12:12 PM
Special needs...what does that mean? Your child is ESFP? :P

deicruxified
12-05-2007, 12:31 PM
Why nonsensical?

it's something i learned 6 years ago. my mom was uber thrifty. we had booming businesses way back then (driving school and rice farm etc...my mom handled all) and my sister and i was raised in luxury. mom has always instilled "saving money" as if it was part of the 10 commandments and would scorn everytime we put something to "waste" according to her. then mysterious strings of fate came in, we were bankrupt (i don't want to tell the whole story if you don't mind) and of course, there were regrets... "i wish i sh/could've... and it's all because of greed." i learned from that lesson pretty well and so did my dad. i just don't know with my mom but compared to what she was before, she's not that much attached to money and business now. and in line with that realization, my charity and volunteering "missions". it's better to spend money on something that's worth your time than stash it up, collect dust and wait for the next weasel to steal them all up.

INTJoe
12-05-2007, 01:51 PM
So y'all got swindled in some form of bad investment? Is that what I'm hearing?

Most of my money is in guaranteed-returns that are FDIC-insured right now.

Don't mistake stock-piling money for greed. They sound similar, but aren't.

Also, not directed towards you, but I'd like to add that most Americans have no idea what they can afford to spend. They attribute "I can pay for this" to "I can afford this". They are NOT the same. And even worse "I can pay for this with my credit card" is attributed to "I can pay for this", which is attributed to "I can afford this." Terrible.

A lot of people (family included) would be shocked at how much money I've saved on a modest income. That's because they're terrible with money. And I didn't understand the value of money until I had some. Now that I have "a lot", I realize that it is not "a lot", considering I don't own a home, and will someday have kids to support.

So, I "stockpile" my money, but I'm not greedy.

deicruxified
12-10-2007, 10:11 AM
So y'all got swindled in some form of bad investment? Is that what I'm hearing?

Most of my money is in guaranteed-returns that are FDIC-insured right now.

Don't mistake stock-piling money for greed. They sound similar, but aren't.

Also, not directed towards you, but I'd like to add that most Americans have no idea what they can afford to spend. They attribute "I can pay for this" to "I can afford this". They are NOT the same. And even worse "I can pay for this with my credit card" is attributed to "I can pay for this", which is attributed to "I can afford this." Terrible.

A lot of people (family included) would be shocked at how much money I've saved on a modest income. That's because they're terrible with money. And I didn't understand the value of money until I had some. Now that I have "a lot", I realize that it is not "a lot", considering I don't own a home, and will someday have kids to support.

So, I "stockpile" my money, but I'm not greedy.

not from bad investment actually all of the are good investments. it's with my mom whe she entrusted someone with the pile (i find this really stupid)... there are other 'emotionalisms' attached so everything was down the drain. of course being an intj asian kid of an asian parent, i told mom that it was and it will never be a good move... if you're reading the 'life of an asian intj thread' you know what i'd get as an answer...

you make sense in some points re "i can afford this" vs "i can pay for this". i am future oriented as well but i did some re-evaluation myself of how things my life would be i the next days. of course i budget and i do include charity in my list. but i think we agree in a common ground of having something for ourselves as well however, mine's quite different because i'm still in the process of thinking whether i'd be keeping kids of my own vs living a single life. i'm still indecisive on that part however if i choose starting a family, probably i could tweak my strategy a bit but more room for savings.

so going back to charity, while i'm still indecisive of what my mid-life will be, i'm trying to put some of my money to good use.

Bossy Mom
12-11-2007, 03:42 PM
I work a lot for the cause of organ donation. My husband was a donor when he died and my daughter is a liver transplant recipient. I don't have much money to give, but I speak about organ donation, work annually on the Donate Life float for the Rose Parade, take our minutes for our volunteer meetings, participate in all the walks, work at health fairs, make baked goods for the bake sales, and donate my handmade quilts for raffles. I do what I can.

yondyr
12-11-2007, 04:10 PM
I never donate, never gamble. Never buy tickets in this that or the other. If I look after my finances/life, I'm not a charge on society... hence not a part of the problem.

AntimonyLegault
12-13-2007, 01:38 AM
Charity is often used by the government, not however, in a way many might think.
Columbia was once a big wheat producer. That was terminated in the 1950's by "Food for Peace' aid. Food for peace sounds nice, but the consuequences are different. Food for peace was not a gift from agribussiness to a impoverished country, it was a gift from the U.S. taxpayer to agribussiness, so the taxpayer was paying agribussiness to essentially send 'free' food to other countries. This wiped out wheat production in Columbia, as it destroyed the wheat market there, it's no longer a major wheat producer and many former peasants moved on to coca production when this happened.

Charity, like most things, is relative to situation and standard. I'd help out the individual if I didn't have to go through some 'middleman' I don't know.

yondyr
12-13-2007, 07:43 AM
If you're looking at the world stage, consider this... if malnourished and needy peoples are given food and medical care then their fertility goes up creating more mouths to feed. Is it wise to make charitable efforts when the consequences compound a problem if compensating measures, even if dictatorial, are not included.

Caramel
12-13-2007, 08:29 AM
I don't have a lot of money (poor student), but I am a organ donor (when I die ofcourse, I'd like to enjoy them myself for now :p), and I donate solutions to about everyone else in university. I help others study, work out algoritmic/programming problems and send those to everyone else with a step-for-step how-to guide..

but I guess that doesn't count.